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What’s the use of a fine house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?

- Henry David Thoreau


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News

Aug 17, 2017

2017 ISA World SUP and Paddleboard Championship Heading to “Cold Hawaii”

The countdown is on for the 2017 ISA World SUP and Paddleboard Championship.

WRITTEN BY

The Outdoor Journal

After the success at Cloudbreak in Fiji last November, this year it’s changing scenery (not to mention temperature) and going to Europe for the first time in Denmark’s Copenhagen and ‘Cold Hawaii’ from September 1-10.

Photo taken by Miguel Sacramento while covering the championship in Fiji for The Outdoor Journal last November.

Keeping everyone on their toes—and hopefully boards, the International Surfing Association continues to promote and expand this quickly growing sport by holding this year’s World Championship in Denmark’s stunning capital city, Copenhagen and Vorupør on the northwest coast. Also known as Cold Hawaii, Vorupør is celebrated for its excellent wave conditions and unique surf & SUP culture.

Photo courtesy of Copencold Hawaii

Following a fourth win for Australia in Fiji in 2016, over 300 paddlers from over 30 countries will be taking part in prone paddleboarding, SUP racing and SUP surfing disciplines to find out who is going to be crowned the 2017 ISA World Champions.

Denmark has 7,500km of stunning coastline which can be reached in a two-hour drive from anywhere in the country. Cold Hawaii’s excellent conditions and the accessibility of the coast have given the sport significant momentum in recent years and SUP has become a popular discipline for many across the country.

Triple SUP Racing World Champion, ISA Vice President and Chairman of the ISA Athletes’ Commission, Casper Steinfath, who is from the Cold Hawaii region of Denmark, said:

Cold Hawaii is a special place in the heart of Denmark for Surfing and StandUp Paddle. This region has cultivated some the country’s top athletes and I cannot wait to welcome the World Championships to our shores. Visiting SportAccord today in my home nation and being able to demonstrate the sport that I love and what Denmark has to offer, is a wonderful moment for me.

Over recent years, SUP has greatly advanced in professionalism and popularity and much of that success is a result of the work conducted by the ISA. Following Surfing’s Olympic inclusion, the ISA has been able to offer so much to SUP, organizing the World Championships, helping to fund development schemes and instructor courses, and bringing a voice to our discipline that can be heard by more people globally.

Will anyone be up to the challenge of ending Australia’s winning streak? Stay tuned to see how the competition unfolds!

It might not be competing for a world title, but the opportunity to SUP through the rainforest sounds pretty good to us too!

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Athletes & Explorers

Dec 13, 2018

Steph Davis: Dreaming of Flying

What drives Steph, to free solo a mountain with nothing but her hands and feet, before base jumping? “Bravery is not caused by the absence of fear."

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WRITTEN BY

The Outdoor Journal

Presented byimage

In the coming days the Outdoor Journal will release an exclusive interview with Steph Davis, follow us via our social networks and stay tuned for more.

Do you have to be fearless to jump off a mountain? Meeting Steph Davis, you quickly realise: no, fearlessness is not what it takes. It’s not the search for thrills that drives her. She’s Mercedes travelled to Moab, Utah to find out what does – and to talk to Steph Davis about what it takes to climb the most challenging peaks and plunge from the highest mountaintops.

Steph Davis, getting ready to jump. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

At noon, when the sun is at its highest point above the deserts of southeastern Utah and when every stone cliff casts a sharp shadow, you get a sense of how harsh this area can be. Despite Utah’s barrenness, Steph loves the orange-gold landscape with its towers and elegantly curved arches of sandstone. But Steph is not here because of the natural spectacle. Here, in this area which is as beautiful as it is inhospitable, she can pursue her greatest passion: free solo climbing and BASE jumping.

Castleton Tower… Look closely. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

Today, Steph wants to take us to Castleton Tower. We travel on gravel roads that are hardly recognizable, right into the middle of the desert. Gnarled bushes and conifers grow along what might be the side of the road. Other than that, the surrounding landscape lives up to its name: it is deserted. Steph loves the remoteness of the area. “One of my favourite places is a small octagonal cabin in the desert that I designed and built together with some of my closest friends. It’s not big and doesn’t have many amenities but it has everything you need: a bed, a bathroom, a small kitchenette … and eight windows allowing me to take in nature around me. That’s pretty much all I need.” Steph Davis cherishes the simple things. She has found her place, and she doesn’t let go.

Whilst pictured with ropes here, Steph often free solo’s without any equipment at all. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

Castleton Tower is home turf for Steph. She has climbed the iconic red sandstone tower so many times she’s lost count. The iconic 120-metre obelisk on top of a 300-metre cone is popular among rock climbers as well as with BASE jumpers. Its isolated position makes it a perfect plunging point and it can easily be summited with little equipment – at least for experienced climbers like Steph Davis.

“It would be reckless not to be afraid. But I don’t have to be paralysed by fear.”

Steph is a free solo climber, which means she relies on her hands and feet only – not on ropes, hooks or harnesses. She loves to free solo, using only what’s absolutely necessary. She squeezes her hands into the tiniest cracks in the stone and her feet find support on the smallest outcroppings, where others would see only a smooth surface. Steph climbs walls that might be 100 metres tall – sometimes rising up 900 metres – with nothing below her but thin air and the ground far below. She knows that any mistake while climbing can be fatal.

Flying. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

The possibility of falling accompanies Steph whenever she climbs. Is she afraid? “Of course – it would be reckless not to be. But I don’t have to be paralysed by fear.” She has learned to transform it into power, prudence, and strength. “It’s up to us to stay in control.”

“You have to learn to face your fears and accept them for what they are.”

That’s what, according to her, free soloing and BASE jumping are all about: to be in control and to trust in one’s abilities. “It’s not about showing off how brave I am. It’s about trusting myself to be good enough not to fall. It takes a lot of strength, both physical and mental. You have to learn to face your fears and accept them for what they are.”

Touchdown. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

Steph Davis likes to laugh and she does so a lot. She chooses her words with care, and she doesn’t rush. Why would she? There’s no point in rushing when you’re hanging on a vertical wall, with nothing but your hands and feet. Just like climbing, she prefers to approach things carefully and analytically. That’s how she got as far as she did. “I didn’t grow up as an athlete, and started climbing when I was 18,” she smiles, shrugging. But her work ethic is meticulous and she knows how to improve herself. Whenever she prepares for an ascent, she does so for months, practising each section over and over again – on the wall and in her head – until she has internalised it all. She does the same before a BASE jump and practices the exact moves in her head until she knows the movement is consummate.

Steph loves the orange-gold landscape with its towers and elegantly curved arches of sandstone. Photo by Jan Vincent Kleine

“Bravery is not caused by the absence of fear.”

Would Steph consider herself brave? She says that she wouldn’t know how to answer that, you can see the small wrinkles around Steph’s eyes that always appear whenever she laughs. In any case, she doesn’t consider herself to be exceptional. “I’m not a heroine just because I jump off mountaintops,” Steph says she has weaknesses just like everyone else. But she might overcome them a little better than most of us do, just as she has learned to work with fear. “Bravery is not caused by the absence of fear. It is brave to accept fear for what it is, as a companion that you should sometimes listen to, but one you shouldn’t be obedient to.”

She slows the car down. We have reached Castleton Tower. It rises majestically in front of us while the sun has left its zenith. If Steph started walking now, she’d reach the top at the moment the sun went down, bathing the surrounding area in a golden light. She takes her shoes and the little parachute; all she needs today. Then she smiles again, says “see you in a bit”, and starts walking. Not fast, not hastily, but without hesitation.

All photos by Jan Vincent Kleine

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