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I am tormented with an everlasting itch for things remote

- Herman Melville

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Destinations

Feb 11, 2019

Forever Moab

Arches, Canyonlands, Zion, Bryce, Capitol Reef…. Five of the most beautiful National Parks in the US are a stone’s throw from Moab, Utah, America’s capital city of extreme sports.

WRITTEN BY

Georges Dutigny

This story originally featured in the Spring 2014 issue of the Outdoor Journal. 

I will never forget Moab, even though we did get off to a bad start, on those first few days there. Alas, Moab itself is nothing more than a small, run-down, backwater town, utterly devoid of charm.  Originally a mining community, constructed after World War II, it was known for its Uranium mines right up until the 1980s. Not exactly a spot you dream of vacationing, even if you are an extreme sports enthusiast.  The architecture is uninteresting, monotonous, boring, without a soul. Even its restaurants are just so-so – what a let down for the taco and red pepper fan in me. In short, Moab the city doesn’t really merit a stop.  And yet, it is known worldwide for the exceptional beauty of its natural surroundings, as well as the infinite number of skydiving, slacklining, trail running and rock climbing sites immortalized by unbelievably talented athletes, in epic movie scenes and most notably, on YouTube.

Driving through Arches National Park, Rangers lead popular walks into this maze of sandstone fins twice each day from April through October. Photo: Apoorva Prasad.

A MILD, WILD, OR EXTREME EXPERIENCE

The thick red cliffs surrounding Moab beckon you to take the plunge as BASE-jumping is legal in most spots. Countless canyons bid beautiful escape, whether by hiking and trail running on foot or by mountain bike. Some of the most difficult bike trails in the US are Slickrock Trail and Amasa Back, the latter ending at the mouth of the Colorado River.  As for the river, whose waters never exceed 10⁰C, even in summer, it offers class 4 and 5 rapids, making it ideal for kayaking and whitewater rafting. And then, everywhere you walk, there will always be that next rock, more stunning than the last, calling out for you to go bouldering: any number of climbing adventures is within reach. When the rock is soft and loose, like sandstone, it can be quite capricious.  Guaranteed to get your blood pumping!

When I think back on my stay in Moab, my blood pressure goes up, my body floods with endorphins and adrenaline. I slip on my trail running shoes, pack my Camelbak, adjust my bike helmet and make sure that my parachute is securely fastened to my back.  You never know. Moab makes you feel like flying! The town is bursting with enterprises ready to accompany you on any one of these marvellous activities. The logical first step in planning a trip is to pay a visit to the office of tourism or to check out the website: www.discovermoab.com.  This will allow you to take in the magnitude of possibility, but also of potential dangers. Remember the movie 127-hours!

Turret Arch in the Windows Section of Arches National Park. In the background, the snow-capped peaks of the La Sal Mountains attain heights of nearly 13,000 feet. Photo: Moab Area Travel Council.

MOAB BASE CAMP

As an outdoor sports vacation destination, Moab gratifies the eyes while invigorating the muscles.  You will sleep, eat breakfast, and have dinner there, but the rest of the time you will get away. If you have the means to pay for a stay in one of the two absolutely amazing resorts, then I highly recommend it.  My preference is Red Cliffs Lodge (www.redcliffslodge.com) because of its warm, familial atmosphere and superior service. Converted to a hotel in 2002, it was formerly a cattle ranch, typical to the region, and is located on the banks of the Colorado River.  Frankly, there’s nothing not to like. All right, maybe the pool is a little conventional, but it was also ranked as one of the pools with the best view in the United States. Whether you are in the pool, your bed, or the restaurant, steep canyons tower all around you. Obviously, it can feel a little enclosed, but that’s inevitable in the area.  Besides, if you borrow a horse, you will be at the summit in a couple of hours. It’s worth noting that the outright finish line for Primal Quest, a very prestigious event and one of the most difficult expedition-length adventure races in the world, was at the hotel in 2006.

Countless canyons bid beautiful escape, whether by hiking on foot or by mountain bike.

Once a genuine working ranch, the hotel has a western themed décor, complete with authentic articles from all over the area.  The owner of the hotel rules her roost with an iron fist and a real sense of showmanship. In the basement, there is a movie theatre and a museum dedicated to all of the actors and movies that have filmed in the region over the years from John Wayne films to Thelma and Louise. Don’t forget the opening scene of John Woo’s Mission Impossible with Tom Cruise, or still yet the notorious 127-hours that I mentioned earlier, the Danny Boyle film with James Franco which is entirely set in Canyonlands, less than 50 km away and Utah’s largest National Park.

For those seeking a bit more luxury, at the price of less local colour, I would recommend Sorrel River Ranch.  Very classy and even more sumptuous, the hotel belongs to a rich family from New York. The villas for rent are magnificent and very cosy.  I don’t have a single complaint about the service in this high-end establishment. It is perfection. You can even bring your own horse (50$ a day) and your dog (100$ room cleaning fee).  It’s a slice of peaceful extravagance in the middle of the Far West, and an ideal couple’s retreat. Hey, what about a honeymoon in Moab? Bring your in-laws. They’ll love you forever!

Cover Photo: The Colorado River’s source is in Colorado but crosses Utah and Arizona while flowing southwest.

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Environment

Aug 20, 2019

Antarctica’s largest floating ice shelf is highly sensitive to warming of the ocean

Much of West Antarctica’s ice lies below sea level, and warming ocean temperatures may lead to runaway ice sheet retreat.

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WRITTEN BY

Dan Lowry

Scientists have long been concerned about the potential collapse of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and its contribution to global sea-level rise. Much of West Antarctica’s ice lies below sea level, and warming ocean temperatures may lead to runaway ice sheet retreat.

This process, called marine ice sheet instability, has already been observed along with parts of the Amundsen Sea region, where warming of the ocean has led to melting underneath the floating ice shelves that fringe the continent. As these ice shelves thin, the ice grounded on land flows more rapidly into the ocean and raises the sea level.

Although the Amundsen Sea region has shown the most rapid changes to date, more ice actually drains from West Antarctica via the Ross Ice Shelf than any other area. How this ice sheet responds to climate change in the Ross Sea region is, therefore, a key factor in Antarctica’s contribution to global sea-level rise in the future.

Periods of past ice sheet retreat can give us insights into how sensitive the Ross Sea region is to changes in ocean and air temperatures. Our research, published today, argues that ocean warming was a key driver of glacial retreat since the last ice age in the Ross Sea. This suggests that the Ross Ice Shelf is highly sensitive to changes in the ocean.

History of the Ross Sea

Since the last ice age, the ice sheet retreated more than 1,000km in the Ross Sea region – more than any other region on the continent. But there is little consensus among the scientific community about how much climate and the ocean have contributed to this retreat.

Much of what we know about the past ice sheet retreat in the Ross Sea comes from rock samples found in the Transantarctic Mountains. Dating techniques allow scientists to determine when these rocks were exposed to the surface as the ice around them retreated. These rock samples, which were collected far from where the initial ice retreat took place, have generally led to interpretations in which the ice sheet retreat happened much later than, and independently of, the rise in air and ocean temperatures following the last ice age.

But radiocarbon ages from sediments in the Ross Sea suggest an earlier retreat, more in line with when climate began to warm from the last ice age.

An iceberg floating in the Ross Sea – an area that is sensitive to warming in the ocean.
Rich Jones, CC BY-ND

Using models to understand the past

To investigate how sensitive this region was to past changes, we developed a regional model of the Antarctic ice sheet. The model works by simulating the physics of the ice sheet and its response to changes in ocean and air temperatures. The simulations are then compared to geological records to check accuracy.

Our main findings are that warming of the ocean and atmosphere were the main causes of the major glacial retreat that took place in the Ross Sea region since the last ice age. But the dominance of these two controls in influencing the ice sheet evolved through time. Although air temperatures influenced the timing of the initial ice sheet retreat, ocean warming became the main driver due to melting of the Ross Ice Shelf from below, similar to what is currently observed in the Amundsen Sea.

The model also identifies key areas of uncertainty of past ice sheet behaviour. Obtaining sediment and rock samples and oceanographic data would help to improve modelling capabilities. The Siple Coast region of the Ross Ice Shelf is especially sensitive to changes in melt rates at the base of the ice shelf, and is therefore a critical region to sample.

Implications for the future

Understanding processes that were important in the past allows us to improve and validate our model, which in turn gives us confidence in our future projections. Through its history, the ice sheet in the Ross Sea has been sensitive to changes in ocean and air temperatures. Currently, ocean warming underneath the Ross Ice Shelf is the main concern, given its potential to cause melting from below.

Challenges remain in determining exactly how ocean temperatures will change underneath the Ross Ice Shelf in the coming decades. This will depend on changes to patterns of ocean circulation, with complex interactions and feedback between sea ice, surface winds and melt water from the ice sheet.

Given the sensitivity of ice shelves to ocean warming, we need an integrated modelling approach that can accurately reproduce both the ocean circulation and dynamics of the ice sheet. But the computational cost is high.

Ultimately, these integrated projections of the Southern Ocean and Antarctic ice sheet will help policymakers and communities to develop meaningful adaptation strategies for cities and coastal infrastructure exposed to the risk of rising seas.The Conversation

Dan Lowry, PhD candidate, Victoria University of Wellington

This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

Cover photo: Since the last ice age, the ice sheet retreated over a thousand kilometres in the Ross Sea region, more than any other region on the continent.
Rich Jones, CC BY-ND

 

Introducing The Outdoor Voyage

Whilst you’re here, given you believe in our mission, we would love to introduce you to The Outdoor Voyage – our booking platform and an online marketplace which only lists good operators, who care for sustainability, the environment and immersive, authentic experiences. All listed prices are agreed directly with the operator, and we promise that 86% of any money spent ends up supporting the local community that you’re visiting. Click the image below to find out more.

 

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