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A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.

- John James Audubon

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Boulder

Aug 25, 2018

Legendary Climber Jeff Lowe Dies at 67

American alpinist and climber Jeff Lowe was suffering from an extremely rare progressive neurodegenerative disease for the last 18 years. He has just passed at a health centre in Colorado, surrounded by friends and family.

WRITTEN BY

Himraj Soin

A climbing legend, Jeff Lowe made more than 1000 first ascents all around the world. An American alpinist from Utah, Jeff was the co-founder of outdoor equipment company, Lowe Alpine. He brought modern ice climbing from Europe to the United States and was a huge proponent of the alpine style. In 2017, he won the Piolets D’or Lifetime Achievement Award. In 1991, he famously climbed Metanoia, the hardest route on the Eiger. 

Suffering from a rare Muscle Neuron Degeneration (MND) similar to ALS, it had left him in a wheelchair, breathing bottled oxygen, coughing through a tracheotomy and eating liquid food through a tube. He required 24/7 nursing supervision. 

“Place your confidence in your dreams, not in your nightmares.”

His daughter Sonja Jane posted on his behalf on Facebook: “My father, Jeff Lowe, to put it in his words, “moved on from this material plane to the next” this evening in a peaceful transition.

The last few days were a beautiful whirlwind of laughter, tears, sadness and new friendships. We lived outside the entire time, where my dad always wanted to be, and created our own “base camp” as the wonderful nurses at Lemay Ave Health & Rehabilitation Center lovingly referred to it. We laughed, cried, and honored his life and the many climbs and many lessons he experienced.… and had a 3 day celebratory party, with him as the guest of honor and the one bringing us all together. We all felt this was exactly what Jeff would have wanted, without a question.

The other thing my dad, Jeff, wanted, was to leave behind a legacy for his granddaughter, Valentina, as well as the rest of the world, by sharing his experience on Metanoia not for a profit, but for a purpose-to enlighten others as to what he experienced. To honor his life, achievements, and contributions to both the climbing world and the universe as a whole, and so his beloved granddaughter always remembers him with as much pride as she does today.  Love always and forever, The luckiest daughter in the world.”

In an article for The Outdoor Journal, “Khumbu Possibilities”, Jeff shared an excerpt of his upcoming book, detailing remarkable mountain experiences from his life, contemplating the unknowable possibilities that the unknown holds, in the mountains and elsewhere. His ultimate goal was securing access to the wilderness for current and future generations, while protecting and preserving all wild places. Interviewed by journalist Michael Levy, he told him that even with his disease, he is simply doing another “first ascent”. Michael said of his visit, “On that second day at Jeff’s house, he ruminated on the importance of living in the present, being open to all the outcomes, twists and turns that are unforeseeable until they happen”.

The Outdoor Journal Founder and Editor-in-Chief Apoorva Prasad also met Jeff Lowe just weeks prior to his passing, to give him a copy of the magazine with his article. He reflected on the news saying, “before us came giants, and in this age of internet celebrities, I try to remember my true heroes, legends like Jeff who achieved feats amongst the mountains, that mere mortals like myself can only dream of”.

“When Michael and I met Jeff a few weeks ago, he seemed happy to finally get a copy of the magazine, and was thanking me – I told him that it was I who needed to thank him, that I was truly honored to have been able to publish his story, and was really looking forward to reading the rest of the memoirs.”  The Outdoor Journal team had been working to release a special online version of the article, to help raise funding for Jeff’s ongoing treatment and medical costs.

“Everyday I’m still in the present, still trying to figure it all out … If you can be in the present moment of your life, you can deal with anything that comes your way,” Jeff said. 

 

 

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Athletes & Explorers

Feb 07, 2019

Mountaineering Scene Mourns the Loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry

The bodies of the highly experienced Scottish climbers were recovered on Wednesday following a fatal fall on Ben Hope in the Highlands.

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WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

Andy Nisbet (65) and Steve Perry (47), two highly experienced members of the Scottish Mountaineering Club, died while climbing Ben Hope this past week. Mountaineering Scotland, an organization for climbing enthusiasts in Scotland, said they were “shocked and saddened” to learn of the deaths of Nisbet and Perry. “Their deaths are a huge loss to the mountaineering community in Scotland.”

“He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures”

Ben Hope is Scotland’s most northerly Munro. Munro is the name given to a mountain in Scotland above 3,000ft. Nisbet and Perry were working on establishing new winter routes on the mountain when they experienced difficulties in their descent and ultimately fell to their deaths. Andy Nisbet is considered the most successful mountaineer to come out of Scotland. He has established over 1,000 winter routes and is extremely well-respected within the climbing community. Mountain guide and author, Martin Moran, spoke highly of Nisbet. “Andy Nisbet is obsessive and fanatical, but he is also a delightful person, and he is an all-around mountaineer. He has also, for a lot of his career, been a full-time instructor. He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures, including new routes.”

“Climbing in Scotland is still my favorite”

When interviewed about expeditions abroad, Nisbet replied, “Climbing in Scotland is still my favourite.” Though he is known for his contributions to the development of Scottish climbing, Nisbet has also contributed a fair amount to routes around the world. “Andy has made an enormous contribution to Scottish mountaineering, but it mustn’t be forgotten that he has also made a contribution to Himalayan mountaineering as well,” says Martin Moran.

“Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!”

Andy Nisbet was known for continuing to pursue new routes and high alpine ascents well into an age where most climbers retire. At age 65, he was still establishing new routes on Munros and climbing as strong as ever. In a video by Dave MacLeod at the Fort William Mountain Festival, Nisbet was quoted saying, “Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!” He mentioned wanting to continue climbing as long as is physically possible. “I hope I’ll be able to go to the hills for a long time… It’s hard to know whether climbing will outlast walking. I used to think I would still hill-walk when I stopped climbing, but actually, you can carry on climbing for possibly longer than hill-walking. It just depends on which parts of the body give up first!”

Andy Nisbet swinging hard. Photo: Masa Sakano.

Steve Perry was also a well-known and highly experienced mountaineer. He had completed an on-foot round of the Munros in addition to his numerous impressive summer and winter climbing ascents. Perry had recently partnered with Nisbet to develop new winter routes on Ben Hope.

The International climbing community is mourning the loss of both climbers today. Cameron McNeish tweeted, “Utterly devastated this morning at the news of the loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry on Ben Hope. Both were gargantuan and inspiring figures in Scotland’s mountaineering scene. A massive loss to us all.

Cover Photo: Image copyright – Dave McGimpsey

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