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A true conservationist is a man who knows that the world is not given by his fathers, but borrowed from his children.

- John James Audubon

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Editor's Letters

Jul 14, 2016

Editors Letter. Issue 11. Summer 2016.

"The biggest untapped source of energy today is our youth. I am from an age of consumerism, but my two daughters are young enough to change the way their generation thinks." Mike Horn

WRITTEN BY

Apoorva Prasad

You can subscribe to the Outdoor Journal here.

I’m sitting in Mike Horn’s boat Pangea, anchored off Wallis Bay, Namibia. He’s docked here on his Pole2Pole expedition, and as a side excursion, he plans to be the first to walk across the entire Namib desert. He’s telling us about Namibia’s pristine wilderness, its lions that range just outside the fence and of the legendary black mamba. I first met Mike some weeks ago in France, where he’s very famous thanks to his TV shows such as “The Island”, where a group of ordinary people are left to survive by themselves for one month on an island.

Let’s take that concept just a little further, shall we? Imagine you’re a group of people living on an island. It’s a pretty large island, and over many years, you’ve explored the boundaries of the island, and you’ve been able to paddle around the entire shore. By now, you know the geography of the island, and its ability to provide you with resources to survive. You also know there’s no way to get off the island for now. There’s a vast ocean all around, that you don’t have the technological means to traverse to any other habitable island at all.

Your small group of people has become much larger over time, and today you realize that the entire island is fully inhabited. There are little signs, everywhere, that you may be running out your ability to provide your group with adequate resources to thrive. Yet your leaders believe in your group’s ability to grow constantly. They calculate prosperity and value based on something called “growth”. Your leaders coin terms like “demographic dividend”. However you know that your group is already jostling for space, there’s violence breaking out in many parts of the island, fighting for resources, and fairly often now, you run out of water, so you have to pray for rain to be able to keep surviving.

Our planet is an island in space.

Modern socioeconomic societies and systems are primarily based on Western philosophical thought which is anthropocentric; while Eastern philosophical systems are eco/biocentric. However, in India, we have strangely abandoned our ecocentric philosophic underpinnings, vote in leaders paying superficial lip-service to our traditional values; while building an economy based on anthropocentric values — which we already know to be flawed and ultimately self-destructive. However, people like Mike, his daughters Annika and Jessica, big-wave charger Francisco Porcella, world-champion and Olympian windsurfer Tony Philp, famous cricket star and surfer Jonty Rhodes, all have something in common. They all share the same vision and mission in life, explore, share, and protect the planet for future generations. We at The Outdoor Journal do not believe that this is possible without immediate action now, which is why we are reaching out, across the globe, to build a powerful network of people who can help us achieve very specific goals in the future to change what people want, and how they go about getting it. What do you think needs to be done for this group to survive on this island?

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Editor's Letters

Aug 14, 2018

Welcome to the new OutdoorJournal.com

A reflection of our new team and iterative process of regular updates to our design, editorial content, business model and much more.

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WRITTEN BY

Apoorva Prasad

In order to achieve our long-term goals, we’ve had to learn some hard lessons, undertake pivots and become more of a tech startup than “just a magazine”. I’ve personally had to go from being “just a journalist” to being the CEO of a tech startup, raise outside funding and relearn software development, nearly 20 years after I quit engineering school in Maryland to climb in the Himalayas, travel and become a storyteller.

You’ll start to see a brand new look to our website and other properties, as well as be able to undertake trips on The Outdoor Voyage (www.outdoorvoyage.com), which we’re also launching via trip pages on The Outdoor Journal itself.

Call us what you will, but The Outdoor Journal & Voyage stands for one thing: to educate, inspire and enable all peoples to enjoy, experience and protect wilderness.

This is also an acknowledgement of the reality that the media industry as we knew it for the last hundred years is essentially dead, that nearly all advertising dollars are scooped up by Facebook and Google today, not independent media businesses like ours; as well as the fact that our readers have constantly asked us who the best travel companies are, globally, and how they could book with them. Our business model is henceforth evolving into a hybrid travel + media model, where a sales commission from a scalable travel booking business is what (we hope) will fund our honest, authentic and independent editorial journalism. Importantly, our marketplace side seeks to promote ethical travel and sustainable development in local communities globally – a mission that received a boost when Booking.com awarded us their second-highest startup grant award last December. Some links you follow may earn us a commission, and we will continue to have some sponsored content or advertising on our channels, but we will always strive to be transparent and explicit about what’s honest, genuine journalism, and what’s not – a rarity in most travel and outdoor media.

We’ve remained a family & friends-funded startup, but sometimes we pitch ourselves to investors calling it a future “Wirecutter for adventure travel” and other times, a potential “NatGeo + Expedia for Adventure”. Call us what you will, but The Outdoor Journal & Voyage stands for one thing: to educate, inspire and enable all peoples to enjoy and experience wilderness. That is our purpose, and we will continue to build and grow towards goals that help us achieve it.

It’s been a long journey, and I invite you to retrace my steps by reading all of the previous Editor’s Letters, which can be found under The Journal.

Finally, should you wish to support our journalism, and everything we stand for, please subscribe to our print magazine here.

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