logo

A man lies and dreams of green fields and rivers

- Pink Floyd

image

Athletes & Explorers

Sep 25, 2018

Indian Sailor Abhilash Tomy Rescued After Severe Injury During Solo Around The World Golden Globe Race

Abhilash Tomy, the first Indian to circumnavigate the globe solo, has been rescued by a French fishing vessel after his yacht dismasted in severe storms, leaving him badly injured.

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

A severe storm in the Indian Ocean has affected several participants in the Golden Globe Race. 14-meter high waves destroyed the mast of Abhilash Tomy’s yacht, Thuriya, and left him immobilized with severe injuries.

Rescue efforts commenced on Saturday when Tomy sent out satellite text messages, “Can’t walk. Might need stretcher.” As well as, “Can move toes. Feel numb. Can’t eat or drink. Tough 2 reach grab bag.”

A multi-national rescue mission was coordinated, including rescue efforts from Australia, India, and France. The French fishing vessel, Osiris, reached Tomy first, approximately 3,300km from Perth, Australia. “He is conscious and safe. Rescue efforts were delayed because of 8-to-10-meter-high waves and heavy winds,” a spokesperson for the Indian Navy said. Tomy was rescued from his yacht on a stretcher, and is now being transferred to Mauritius, where he will receive further medical attention.

The Golden Globe Race is a non-stop, around-the-world, sailing race, where competitors are limited to sailing without modern technology or satellite navigation aids. The race started on July 1st, 2018, and is expected to take the winning yacht around 260 days to complete.

PPL Photo Agency – Copyright free for editorial use only. Photo Credit: Christophe Favreau/PPL/GGR ***2018 Golden Globe Race. Commander Abhilash Tomy his Suhaili replica yacht THURIYA , photographed off Lanzarote, Canaries during the compulsory film drop off Marina Rubicon on 16th June 2018. The yacht was rolled and dismasted in the South Indian Ocean (1,900 miles SW of Perth, Australia) on 21st September and a full rescue organised by the Australian Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Canberra to repatriate the inured solo sailor.

In 2013, Abhilash Tomy became the first Indian to circumnavigate the globe solo. His name appears on the Joshua Slocum Society International, a list honoring long-distance sailors for impressive solo sea voyages.

Tomy is one of 18 competitors who entered the 2018 Golden Globe Race. He was sitting in 3rd place before the storm hit and rolled his yacht 360 degrees, dismantling the mast and leaving him injured.

Photo Credit: Christophe Favreau/PPL/GGR ***2018 Golden Globe Race. Commander Abhilash Tomy his Suhaili replica yacht THURIYA , photographed off Lanzarote, Canaries during the compulsory film drop off Marina Rubicon on 16th June 2018. The yacht was rolled and dismasted in the South Indian Ocean (1,900 miles SW of Perth, Australia) on 21st September and a full rescue organised by the Australian Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Canberra to repatriate the inured solo sailor.

Read more about Abhilash Tomy here:
https://www.outdoorjournal.com/focus-2/indian-sails-across-world-alone-enters-the-record-books/

Cover photo: PPL Photo Agency – Copyright free for editorial use only
Photo Credit: Christophe Favreau/PPL/GGR
***2018 Golden Globe Race. Commander Abhilash Tomy his Suhaili replica yacht THURIYA , photographed off Lanzarote, Canaries during the compulsory film drop off Marina Rubicon on 16th June 2018.
The yacht was rolled and dismasted in the South Indian Ocean (1,900 miles SW of Perth, Australia) on 21st September and a full rescue organised by the Australian Maritime Rescue Co-ordination Centre in Canberra to repatriate the inured solo sailor.

Continue Reading

image

Athletes & Explorers

Feb 07, 2019

Mountaineering Scene Mourns the Loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry

The bodies of the highly experienced Scottish climbers were recovered on Wednesday following a fatal fall on Ben Hope in the Highlands.

image

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

Andy Nisbet (65) and Steve Perry (47), two highly experienced members of the Scottish Mountaineering Club, died while climbing Ben Hope this past week. Mountaineering Scotland, an organization for climbing enthusiasts in Scotland, said they were “shocked and saddened” to learn of the deaths of Nisbet and Perry. “Their deaths are a huge loss to the mountaineering community in Scotland.”

“He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures”

Ben Hope is Scotland’s most northerly Munro. Munro is the name given to a mountain in Scotland above 3,000ft. Nisbet and Perry were working on establishing new winter routes on the mountain when they experienced difficulties in their descent and ultimately fell to their deaths. Andy Nisbet is considered the most successful mountaineer to come out of Scotland. He has established over 1,000 winter routes and is extremely well-respected within the climbing community. Mountain guide and author, Martin Moran, spoke highly of Nisbet. “Andy Nisbet is obsessive and fanatical, but he is also a delightful person, and he is an all-around mountaineer. He has also, for a lot of his career, been a full-time instructor. He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures, including new routes.”

“Climbing in Scotland is still my favorite”

When interviewed about expeditions abroad, Nisbet replied, “Climbing in Scotland is still my favourite.” Though he is known for his contributions to the development of Scottish climbing, Nisbet has also contributed a fair amount to routes around the world. “Andy has made an enormous contribution to Scottish mountaineering, but it mustn’t be forgotten that he has also made a contribution to Himalayan mountaineering as well,” says Martin Moran.

“Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!”

Andy Nisbet was known for continuing to pursue new routes and high alpine ascents well into an age where most climbers retire. At age 65, he was still establishing new routes on Munros and climbing as strong as ever. In a video by Dave MacLeod at the Fort William Mountain Festival, Nisbet was quoted saying, “Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!” He mentioned wanting to continue climbing as long as is physically possible. “I hope I’ll be able to go to the hills for a long time… It’s hard to know whether climbing will outlast walking. I used to think I would still hill-walk when I stopped climbing, but actually, you can carry on climbing for possibly longer than hill-walking. It just depends on which parts of the body give up first!”

Andy Nisbet swinging hard. Photo: Masa Sakano.

Steve Perry was also a well-known and highly experienced mountaineer. He had completed an on-foot round of the Munros in addition to his numerous impressive summer and winter climbing ascents. Perry had recently partnered with Nisbet to develop new winter routes on Ben Hope.

The International climbing community is mourning the loss of both climbers today. Cameron McNeish tweeted, “Utterly devastated this morning at the news of the loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry on Ben Hope. Both were gargantuan and inspiring figures in Scotland’s mountaineering scene. A massive loss to us all.

Cover Photo: Image copyright – Dave McGimpsey

Recent Articles



Flow State: The Reason Why Alex Honnold and Steph Davis are not Adrenaline Junkies.

“When you’re pushing the limits of ultimate human performance, the choice is stark: it’s flow or die.”

The Rise of Ironman

Few in the passionate throng who anticipate the annual Ironman race realize how close the original idea for the race was to being left for dead. This is the story of Ironman’s unlikely genesis.

White Death

Galvanised by their 6,000-meter ascent, a party of climbers disregard the most basic safety rule. The rescue worker is well reputed, but up there, life hangs by a thread.

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary

Advertising

Analytics

Other