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Environment

Aug 31, 2018

Photograph Collection: When it all Comes Together for Wildlife

Trafficking in wildlife products is reaching an all-time high, but there are a number of people working together in South Luangwa National Park, for the common good of conservation.

WRITTEN BY

Sarah Kingdom

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Zambia’s South Luangwa National Park marks the end of the Great Rift Valley, it is a world-renowned wildlife haven and home to a dazzling array of wildlife. Concentrations of game along the wide, meandering Luangwa River, with its ox-bow lakes and its lagoons plays host to huge concentrations of game, are amongst the densest in Africa. The river, teeming with crocodiles and hippos, provides a lifeline for a huge diversity of habitats and wildlife, supporting more than 60 species of mammals and over 400 species of bird.

A Puku mother and calf walk along the bank of the Kabamba River at sunset.

However, it has not all been smooth sailing. The park faces widespread poaching of big game (for ivory and game meat) and there is the never ending challenge of snaring, which is not only a direct threat, but also represents a danger to non-target species such as elephants, lions and wild dogs. Consumption of bush meat and trafficking in wildlife products is reaching an all-time high.

In a park that covers 9,050km2, combating these threats, not only requires a herculean, but a collaborative effort.

A beautiful young lioness from the Hollywood pride.

Enter Conservation South Luangwa (CSL)…

CSL is a Zambian, non-profit, wildlife protection and rescue organisation whose mission is “to work with community and conservation partners in the protection of the wildlife and habitats of the South Luangwa ecosystem”.

However, Conservation does not come cheap and CSL is reliant on funding and donations to maintain its presence in the park and continue protecting the precious wildlife of South Luangwa.

The unblinking eyes of a vigilant lioness.

Enter Patrick Bentley…

Patrick Bentley is an award winning fine art nature photographer from Zambia. He creates images using a variety of techniques and creative ideas to provide a fresh perspective on the natural world, with a particular emphasis on black and white, infrared and aerial photography, sometimes in combination.

Patrick has collected together a stunning selection of his photographs in his book, TIMELESS. You guessed it: The introduction to the book was written by Rachel McRobb (CEO and founder of Conservation South Luangwa) and $20 from every book sold will go directly to CSL to support their commitment to the conservation and preservation of the local wildlife and natural resources in South Luangwa.

At the break of dawn, a male lion wades across the shallow Luangwa River

Enter Lion Camp…

Lion Camp in South Luangwa was Patrick’s base for a considerable time and the majority of the images in his book were taken in the vicinity of this special camp. Set in a unique location in the remote north of the park and surrounded with an abundance of wildlife.

More information about CSL, Patrick and Lion Camp can all be found via the links below, and of course, we encourage you to order the book for yourself here: http://www.patrickbentley.com/timeless

Framed by the forest, a foraging elephant stops to feed.
A lioness from the Hollywood pride pauses to look across an oxbow lagoon.
As billowing clouds bring the promise of rain, a herd of elephants cross the shallow Kabamba river.
Two big elephant bulls follow the course of the Mwamba River.
A tender moment between a leopard mother and cub.

Website: www.patrickbentley.com
Facebook: www.facebook.com/patrickbentleyphotography
Instagram: @patrickbentleyphotography
Conservation South Luangwa: https://cslzambia.org
Lion Camp: https://lioncamp.com


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