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Athletes & Explorers

Oct 15, 2019

Tony Riddle Crosses Great Britain Barefoot but Not Broken

Natural Lifestyle coach Tony Riddle put his rewilding practices to the test by running 874 miles across Great Britain entirely barefoot to support environmental sustainability.

WRITTEN BY

Davey Braun

Tony Riddle has done it. He completed the challenge that he set out for himself on the first of September – to run barefoot across the island of Great Britain. Tony ran from Land’s End, the Southern tip of the UK, to the northernmost village of the mainland of Scotland. Originally, the idea was to run 30 miles per day for 30 days; however, as the old saying goes, “Man plans, and God laughs.” The Outdoor Journal sat down with Tony to discuss his barefoot journey and the disconnect between modern living and our true potential as humans. (You can listen to the full podcast episode here).

In his daily life, Tony coaches people to live a more natural lifestyle and feel better in their bodies. He points out small changes that people can make to massively improve their quality of life in the office, at home and most importantly, outside – from sitting positions, to squatting, to walking posture, to running technique and beyond. Some of the central tenets that we can all experiment with are breath work, meditation, cold immersion, mobility, movement and a plant based diet. To learn more about Tony’s ancient, yet avant-garde rewilding practices, check out our 4-part series Rewild with Tony Riddle.

Tony’s feet after four days running 30 miles per day barefoot on the roads across Great Britain.

Tony committed to run across Great Britain, in part, to set an example of just what amazing things the human body is capable of doing. But he was also driven to raise awareness and support for modern sustainability practices. He selected six organisations that are making a difference, and you can find a link to donate on his page. Each day, Tony broke the 30 miles down into three sets of 10 miles, in the breaks, he sat down with environmentalists to discuss practices to conserve our environment for the next generation. Tony cares deeply about the planet’s future. He has three children, and together, they supported his month-long journey alongside Tony and his wife Katarina, who was pregnant with another one on the way.

Tony with his wife Katarina and three daughters after completing the 874 mile journey from Land’s End to John O’Groats.

If you followed Tony’s Instagram stories on his journey, then you were swept up in the rollercoaster ride of emotions as well. Early on, Tony seemed invincible, as he gleefully sang songs about his daily mileage. But after a week, the wear of the road took its toll. Tony sustained a cut on his foot that looked like a centuries-old jagged crack in bedrock. Tony’s foot and ankle swelled up so much that it more closely resembled a sack of potatoes than a foot. Tony bravely shared his deep frustration and sorrow in his decision-making process to take rest days, which forced him to run back to back ultra-marathons on the final two days of September, finishing with a 47-mile day 29 and a 57-mile day 30. He pushed through the last half mile “in absolute agony,” as he said in his story, accompanied by his daughters, who looked up at him with absolute pride.

Tony on day 28 with 100 miles left to go.

Looking at this challenge through a periscope, outside of time and space, Tony wouldn’t have wanted it to be easy. Deep in his soul, he asked for each and every painful step. Through the process of overcoming, Tony shared powerful tools with his audience that he used to drag himself out of the “pain cave,” as he calls it, and back into the light. For more of Tony’s insights, listen to the full discussion on The Outdoor Journal Podcast.

To connect with Tony, visit tonyriddle.com

Facebook: @naturallifestylist
Instagram: @thenaturallifestylist
Twitter: @feedthehuman
Youtube: Tony Riddle

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Athletes & Explorers

Oct 31, 2019

New World Record: Nirmal Purja Summits the 14 Highest Peaks in Just 6 Months

Nepali ex-soldier Nirmal Purja just smashed the record for summiting all the 8000ers in just half a year—the previous record? The same achievement took Kim Chang-ho, over seven years.

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WRITTEN BY

Himraj Soin

Nirmal Purja is a Nepali mountaineer and a former British Marine. He joined the British Army in 2003, became a Royal Marine in 2009, and only started climbing as recently as 2012—when he decided to climb Everest. In 2018, Purja was awarded the MBE, a civilian honour, by Queen of the United Kingdom.

According to his Instagram post on October 29th, Purja or “Nims”, and his team reached the summit of Shisha Pangma at 8:58 AM local time. This was his 14th peak, and his team members were Mingma David Sherpa, Galjen Sherpa and Gesman Tamang.

Previously, South Korean climber Kim Chang-ho was the record holder, completing the summits in seven years, while Polish climber Jerzy Kukuczka completed them in a little under eight years.

Purja climbed Annapurna in Nepal on April 23rd, Dhaulagiri in Nepal on May 12th, Kanchenjunga in Nepal on May 15th, Everest in Nepal on May 22nd, Lhotse in Nepal on May 22nd, Makalu in Nepal on May 24th, Nanga Parbat in Pakistan on July 3rd, Gasherbrum 1 in Pakistan on July 15th, Gasherbrum 2 in Pakistan on July 18th, K2 in Pakistan on July 24th, Broad Peak in Pakistan on July 26th, Cho Oyu in China on September 23rd, Manaslu in Nepal on September 27th, and finally Shishapangma in China on October 29th.

 

View this post on Instagram

 

United we conquer ! Here is to The A-team 🙌🏼 . .(Climbing team ) @mingma_david_sherpa , @gesmantamang , @geljen_sherpa_ @zekson_srpa ,Halung Dorchi . . . The journey of 14/7 has tested us all the way though at many levels. Together we have been through so much, we climbed not only as a team but as brothers with one sole goal to make the impossible possible pushing the human limitations to next level. Now, the BROTHERHOOD that we share between us is even STRONGER ! . . #trust #brotherhood #team . . 14/14 ✅ #14peaks7months #History . . #nimsdai #BremontProjectPossible ‬ #dedication #resilience #extremehighaltitudemountaineering #uksf #extremeoftheextreme #nolimit #silxo #ospreyeurope #antmiddleton #digi2al #adconstructiongroup #omnirisc #summitoxygen #inmarsat #thrudark #gurkhas #sherpas #elitehimalayanadventures #alwaysalittlehigher

A post shared by Nirmal Purja MBE – Nimsdai (@nimsdai) on

Apparently, he could’ve made better time had it not been for a few hiccups along the way—from being help up for permissions to climb in Tibet, to stretching out his Lhotse, Everest, and Makalu climbs to take a break. During his descent from Annapurna, Purja and his team rescued Malaysian climber Wui Kin Chin, who was not doing well at 7500m. On their descent of Kanchenjunga, Purja and his team gave up their oxygen to three climbers who had run out of their supply. While climbing Everest, he had to wait in line for hours, and ended up taking the viral photograph of the “traffic jam” on Everest.

Today, Nims gave a shout out to his teammates on Instagram, “United we conquer! Here is to The A-team! The journey of 14/7 has tested us all the way though at many levels. Together we have been through so much, we climbed not only as a team but as brothers with one sole goal to make the impossible possible pushing the human limitations to the next level. Now, the BROTHERHOOD that we share between us is even STRONGER!”

Apart from climbing all 14 of the world’s 8000m peaks in under 7 months, and partly due to this enormous feat, he also holds a few other records—most 8000m mountains in the spring season (climbing six), most 8000m mountains in the summer season (climbing five), fastest summit of the three highest mountains in the world—Everest, K2, and Kanchenjunga, fastest summit of the five highest mountains in the world—Everest, K2, Kanchenjunga, Lhotse and Makalu, fastest lower 8000ers, Gasherbrum 1, 2, and Broad Peak, and fastest higher 8000ers, consecutive summits of Everest, Lhotse and Makalu in 48 hours (beats his own previous record of five days).

The backbone of the climbing industry in Nepal, sherpas are often overlooked and don’t get nearly as much international recognition as their comrades from the west. In Purja’s case, as his website mentions, the reason you may not have heard of him before is that he spent the last 16 years serving in the UK military. For more information on Purja, head over to projectimpossible.co.uk.

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