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The most dangerous worldview is the worldview of those who have not viewed the world.

- Alexander von Humboldt


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Sep 18, 2017

Do you even Yoga?

Whether you’re planning on hiking, surfing, or doing any sport really—yoga will only make you better at these activities by strengthening the body, building stamina, and of course, improving flexibility.

WRITTEN BY

The Outdoor Journal

The combination of asana (yoga pose) with pranayama (breathing) helps the body in many ways. Here are some easy steps to help adapt your yoga practice and to get you ready for the outdoors!
  1.  Try a gentler approach. If you’re performing a yoga pose that increases your body temperature (like Surya Namaskara) then slow down. Don’t rush, go at a little slower pace than normal. Take two breaths rather than one.
  2. Consider your timing. Try practicing during the early morning hours when your body and the weather are cooler. Generally, it’s a good idea to avoid practicing during the heat of the day and especially in direct sunlight. This is a sure way to overheat the body.
  3. The third and final step is to choose yoga poses that help the body release heat, such as forward bends. We will show a few poses perfect for this. Forward bending poses physically cool down the body and help keep the mind calm. These are extremely helpful to counteract deep and more intense back bending poses.
 Get out of your head and get outside, breathe some fresh air, find your inner self, and incorporate these simple yoga postures into your lifestyle. Each one of the following poses are performed by Ashtanga Yoga Instructor & Practitioner, Alejandra Uranga. She is wearing yoga apparel from her own clothing line (Ananda 108) that she co-founded. Ananda 108 recently launched their online store where they sell a variety of yoga apparel that is perfect for this summer season. Check it out at ananda108clothing.com

All of the poses pictured are part of the Ashtanga Yoga series.

SURYA NAMASKARA
Start in Samasthitih (the mountain pose).
  1. INHALE. Bring the arms up.
  2. EXHALE. Bend the torso forward and bring the head towards the knees.
  3. INHALE. Lift the torso and head half way and look forward.
  4. EXHALE. Chaturanga, jump back with your legs like a plane pose (keep the hands and toes on the floor only) but move the body lower.
  5. INHALE. Urdhva mukha, push the chest forward, lift the head upward, straighten the arms and the thighs or knees shouldn’t touch the floor.
  6. EXHALE. Adho mukha, lift the waist up, bring the heels towards the floor, bring the gaze towards the navel and stay here for 5 breaths.
  7. INHALE. Jump so that the feet are in the middle of the hands, and lift the head up.
  8. EXHALE. Bend the torso forward as shown in fig. 2.
  9. INHALE. Lift the arms up.
  10. EXHALE. Samasthitih.
PRASĀRITA PĀDOTTANASANA  
1. Spread your legs to the length of your mat around 3 or 4 feet.
2. INHALE. Place the hands on the waist.
3. EXHALE. Move forward and catch the big toes.
4. INHALE. Lift the head and look forward.
5. EXHALE. Place the head on the floor if possible (if not, just try to go as low as you can and hold the position for 5 breaths).
6. INHALE. Lift the head only.
7. EXHALE. Hands on the hips.

8. INHALE. Come up and return to Samasthitih.


JĀNU SĪRSĀSANA 
1. Sit on the mat with the legs straight.
2. Fold the right leg to the side touching the inner thigh with the toes, keep the left leg straight and grab the left foot (if this is not possible just take your leg as far that you can).
3. EXHALE. Try to reach the knee with the head, stay here for 5 breaths.
4. INHALE. Lift the head up, and do the same to the other side.

MARĪCASANA  A
1. Continue on the floor in a seated position, legs straight.
2. Bend the right knee up and bring the right foot next to the right gluteus.
3. Wrap the right arm around the leg, locking the hands behind the back (if you cannot reach the hands you can take a towel or a belt and use it to help your hands together).
4. EXHALE. Try to reach the knee with the chin, stay here 5 breaths.
5. INHALE. Lift the head only and switch to do the same for the left side.
BADDHA KONĀSANA
1. Stay in seated position.
2. Bring the feet together, draw the heels in to the pelvis.
3. Fold both legs to the side and open the feet with the hands to help the hips open more.
4. EXHALE. Place the chin on the floor if possible. If not go as low as possible, keeping the back straight, breathe 5 times.
5. INHALE. Sit again and do the left side.

SALAMBA SARVĀNGĀSANA
1. Lie down on the floor or mat.
2. INHALE. Bring the legs up, place the hands on your upper back for support, try to align the shoulder, hips and feet in one vertical line, if this is to intense for you do Halasana.
3.Hold the posture for 10 breaths, and move to the floor slowly.

HALĀSANA
1. From Salamaba Sarvāngāsana, bring the legs behind the head and place the feet on the floor, toes pointing downwards.
2. Stretch your arms forward and interlace the fingers.
3. Hold the posture for 8 breaths.
4. To leave the posture you can place the hands on your back to help the torso and legs to return to the floor.
MATSYĀSANA
1. You can do this posture from Padmasana or lotus position in the legs. For a variation you can just cross your legs or bend your knees with the soles on the floor.
2. Bring the chest up and place the crown of the head on the floor, if your legs are in Padmasana, wrap the feet and the arms straight, hold the posture for 8 breaths.
Note: for the posture you need to be careful with the neck because it is an intense stretch. You can just place the elbows firmly on the floor next to the chest. To leave the posture you can place the arms on the floor and go down slowly.
Remember that these are postures that we recommend, but is very important that you find a teacher to provide proper guidance. Each person is different, each body is different, and we need to adapt the practice according to our necessities.
Post in collaboration with Ananda 108 clothing.
Thank you for supporting the brands that make The Outdoor Journal possible

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Adventure Travel

Jul 31, 2018

Kayaking’s Elite Return to India at the Malabar River Festival

During the week of July 18th to 22nd, the Malabar River Festival returned to Kerala, India with one of the biggest cash prizes in whitewater kayaking in the world.

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WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

A $20,000 purse attracted some of the world’s best kayakers to the region for an epic week battling it out on some of India’s best whitewater.

The kayaking events at Malabar River Festival were held on the Kuttiyadi River, Chalippuzha River, and the Iruvajippuzha River, in South India on the Malabar Coast. The festival was founded and organized by Manik Taneja and Jacopo Nordera of GoodWave Adventures, the first whitewater kayaking school in South India.

Photo: Akash Sharma

“Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there”

One of the goals of the festival is to promote whitewater kayaking in the state of Kerala and encourage locals to get into the sport. One of the event organizers, Vaijayanthi Bhat, feels that the festival plays a large part in promoting the sport within the community.  “The kayak community is building up through the Malabar Festival. Quite a few people are picking up kayaking… It starts with people watching the event and getting curious.  GoodWave Adventures are teaching the locals.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

Vaijayanthi is not lying when she says the kayak community is starting to build up.  In addition to the pro category, this year’s Malabar Festival hosted an intermediate competition specifically designed for local kayakers. The intermediate competition saw a huge turnout of 22 competitors in the men’s category and 9 competitors in the women’s category. Even the professional kayakers who traveled across the world to compete at the festival were impressed with the talent shown by the local kayakers. Mike Dawson of New Zealand, and the winner of the men’s pro competition had nothing but good things to say about the local kayakers. “I have so much respect for the local kayakers. I was stoked to see huge improvements from these guys since I met them in 2015. It was cool to see them ripping up the rivers and also just trying to hang out and ask as many questions about how to improve their paddling. It was awesome to watch them racing and making it through the rounds. Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

 

“It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake”

Vaijayanthi says the festival has future goals of being named a world championship.  In order to do this, they have to attract world class kayakers to the event.  With names like Dane Jackson, Nouria Newman, Nicole Mansfield, Mike Dawson, and Gerd Serrasolses coming out for the pro competition, it already seems like they are doing a good job of working toward that goal! The pro competition was composed of four different kayaking events- boatercross, freestyle, slalom, and a superfinal race down a technical rapid. “The Finals of the extreme racing held on the Malabar Express was the favourite event for me. It was an epic rapid to race down. 90 seconds of continuous whitewater with a decent flow. It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake.” says Dawson.

Photo: Akash Sharma

The impressive amount of prize money wasn’t the only thing that lured these big name kayakers to Kerala for the festival. Many of the kayakers have stayed in South India after the event ended to explore the rivers in the region. With numerous unexplored jungle rivers, the possibilities for exploratory kayaking are seemingly endless. Dawson knows the exploratory nature of the region well.  “I’ve been to the Malabar River Fest in 2015. I loved it then, and that’s why I’ve been so keen to come back. Kerala is an amazing region for kayaking. In the rainy season there is so much water, and because the state has tons of mountains close to the sea it means that there’s a lot of exploring and sections that are around. It’s a unique kind of paddling, with the rivers taking you through some really jungly inaccessible terrain. Looking forward to coming back to Kerala and also exploring the other regions of India in the future.”

 

For more information on the festival, visit: http://www.malabarfest.com/

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