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Adventure Travel

Mar 08, 2017

Female Adventure Photographers Risking Their Lives For the Shot – Part 1

In a field heavily dominated by men, it takes a few dedicated, badass women to push the limits and influence their industry.

WRITTEN BY

Laura Szanto

Here are tips from some of the most talented female action photographers thriving in adventure photography, giving us a look through their lens.

More adventure visuals in Part 2 with the wildly talented Jody MacDonald, Savannah Cummins and Robin O’neill here.

Adventure and action sports have drawn our attention for decades. Regardless of which specific adventure sports we are drawn to, we find meaning in the pursuit of psychological thrill despite its inherent risks. It allows us to explore new territories, test physical limits, and most importantly, to feel alive.

Elias Ambuhl in Cardrona, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford

Passion, persistence and hard work are all imperative driving forces in an adventure photography career. Days in the field can be long and adverse circumstances such as terrible weather can make it especially exhausting. However, challenges aside, there are adventure photographers out there who know how to push the limits and deliver incredible work.

Female adventure photographers are a less dominant, but an equally inspiring and influential group of talented athletes, who risk their lives daily to produce captivating stories and compelling sports imagery.

To celebrate the lives of these extraordinary women and get a more personal look at how they do what they do, here are the first 3 of 6 interviews exploring their challenges, pro tips and types of essential gear needed in their exceptional adventure photography careers.

KrystleWright-This is Spanish paraglider Horacio Llorens sweeping over the streets of Medellín
Spanish paraglider Horacio Llorens over the streets of Medellín. Photo by Krystle Wright

Krystle Wright

KrystleWright headshot - CanonAustralian born extreme sports photographer Krystle Wright is known for her fearless and ambitious photography projects. From paragliding above the Karakoram Range in Pakistan to hanging outside of helicopters to capture base jumpers in Utah, Krystle doesn’t shy away from even the most precarious of opportunities. Krystle has earned a top spot as an adventure photographer and has had her photography showcased in variety of international magazines, publications and contests. Her extensive portfolio includes sports such as base jumping, rock climbing and paragliding, surfing, kayaking, mountain biking, skiing, mountaineering, slack-lining, freediving—and even elephant polo. Is there anything out there that she hasn’t photographed yet? Earning her title as a Cannon Masters ambassador, Krystle’s creativity is as limitless as it is bold. If you want some great insight into a day in the life of an extreme adventure photographer, take a look at her personal experiences and advice.

Photo by Krystle Wright
Emily Sukiennik highlining between a natural arch outside of Moab, UT. Photo by Krystle Wright

Challenges
There have been so many challenges in my career but to be relatable to the present, I’m currently struggling with balance. Being a freelance, there’s no set hours and I find it a huge challenge to balance between running my business, training, actually shooting and maintaining relationships with friends and family. It’s been a big learning curve in learning how to prioritise my time and use it well.

Krystle Wright injury photo Instagram

Tips
For any aspiring photographer I always tell them that you will need patience and persistence. This is not an easy career to break through but any career that is a passion will always take the extra mile of hard work. The other challenge of being a new photographer is that I think it’s essential to develop a thick skin because not everyone is going to love your work and it’s important to take on criticism in order to evolve and grow as a photographer. Finally, when it comes to adventure photography, this is a lifestyle, not a job.

Matt Fleischman leaping from Looking Glass Arch. Photo by Krystle Wright
Matt Fleischman leaping from Looking Glass Arch—taking off only 128ft. above the ground. Photo by Krystle Wright
Highlining Cape Pillar in Tasmania. Photo by Krystle Wright
Highlining Cape Pillar in Tasmania. Photo by Krystle Wright

Essential Gear
Well I rely on everything in my kit to work. I use Canon cameras and lenses, AquaTech underwater housing, Western Digital hard drives, Goal Zero for solar and battery charging equipment, KEEN to make rad shoes, F-Stop Gear for the most durable camera backpack I’ve ever owned and SanDisk for CF cards. There’s nothing in particular that stands out because depending on the job whether it’s in the ocean or on the mountain, I need to rely on everything I have.

Photo by Krystle Wright
Brett Wright carves a turn whilst kite surfing off the coast of Eagle Island on the Great Barrier Reef. Photo by Krystle Wright

Find more of Krystle’s limitless work on Instagram: @krystlejwright


Dawn Kish

Dawn KishThis Arizona based outdoor adventure photographer is unique in how she engages her audience with playful and humorous imagery. Her portfolio ranges from stories of people with odd jobs, to videos of a day in the life of her quirky photography adventures. Amusement aside, she also showcases award winning imagery of glacier crossings, wanderings in the desert, slacklining, ice climbing, rock climbing, white water rafting and mountain biking. She covers everything from action sports photography to archeology—but not without her own playful flare. Prepare to be inspired by Dawn’s incredible and creative portfolio and her experiences as a successful adventure photographer.

Tips
It helps to go light so you can go fast and work with the light you have. Pay close attention to the weather because you really can make or break a photo if you’re not observant. Also, make sure you know how to survive out there. It helps to take Wilderness First Responder courses or any backcountry course. If you can, I would scout locations as this is very beneficial. You need to have everything working in your favour out there in those wild places.

Being a photographer is hard work. If you have a good work ethic, you will go a long way. Also, you have to become a business person which is really difficult because all you want to do is take the photos and travel. Sorry gals, you’ve got to get a plan together.

Photo by Dawn Kish
Photo by Dawn Kish

Challenges
Outdoor photography is a challenge. Keeping things dry or dust free with many environmental changes are always a factor. Never change a lens in the wind. Batteries in cold weather suck so I put them in your pocket to keep them warm. Being on a river, well, waterproofing is always difficult. Freezing your knees off in the snow is not fun so i wear knee pads. You learn and suffer over the years to make things work better for you.’

Margeaux Bestard in the white-water, Colorado River, Grand Canyon, Arizona. Photo by Dawn Kish

Essential Gear
I have all types of cameras and lens but I mostly shoot with Nikon. But, a camera is a camera, it is your creative eye that makes you and not the gear. I use my iPhone a bunch and just had a portfolio published just from my phone. Gotta love that.

Photo by Dawn Kish
Photo by Dawn Kish

Extra Words of Wisdom
Photography should be fun and creative so make sure you have a blast out there. Have respect for your lovely models and make sure you pay them whether it is with beer or your beer money.

Have respect for the environment you are in and leave it better than you found it.

Dawn Kish slacklining sunset
Photo by Dawn Kish

Encourage each other. Photographers should help each other out and not become competitive. We should not take things so personally. Try to inspire and keep your chin up when things don’t seem fair. A positive attitude goes much further in life. Who cares what other have going on. Focus… hahaha… get it?

Dawn Kish backbend
Photo by Dawn Kish

Find more of Dawn’s beautifully quirky work on Instagram: @dawnkishphoto


Camilla Rutherford

CamillaRutherforddouble_profile

Camilla Rutherford is an adventure, commercial and travel photographer based in New Zealand. Her reputable photography in sports such as mounting biking, snowboarding, hiking, base jumping have earned her international publications and awards around the world. Aside from her successful editorial work, Camilla is also a passionate traveler. Her journeys to Nepal, China, Japan, India, Switzerland and New Zealand will surely inspire you to explore new perspectives and discover the unknown. Her talent will blow you away. With Camilla’s extensive amount of experience in the field, these are some of her invaluable suggestions.

Kelly McGarry-Central OtagoNZ-Camilla Rutherford
Kelly McGarry, Central Otago, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford
Tips
Being out there! I always think to myself, even if I have no work or current projects on the boil, I’m not going to take any awesome photos sitting inside! So I try and get outside as much as possible, even if its raining, as you never know whats going to happen.
Also self belief. Its not easy, but nothing worth doing is! The way I see it is that
I didnt have a choice. It’s what I do, it’s in my blood, and I would never ever
have considered doing anything else. It’s my unconscious choice, and you have

to be in it a thousand percent to make it work. I’m still trying every day to make it work.

I don’t think you ever stop.

ConorMacFarlane-QueenstownNZ-Camilla Rutherford
Conor MacFarlane, Queenstown, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford

Ski shot tips
Shooting skiing is very hard. There are so many elements to make a great ski shot. Experience, I think, is the best thing that’s going to make you ‘good’. Being at the right place, at the right time, and communicating with your athlete are only small portions of what it takes to get a great ski shot. Light, snow and luck come into it hugely. It is harder than anyone could imagine to get that perfect powder shot, and many times its just one turn on the right spot that gives you the gold.

Heli skiing BlackPeak, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford
Heli skiing BlackPeak, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford
Challenges
Being there. The physical aspect of being at the right place at the
right time is a challenge. Climbing that mountain, skiing those steeps, biking
those trails to be with your athlete, to get the shot—all while carrying camera

gear!

Janina_Kuzma_mountaineering - Franz Joseph Glacier, NZ-Camilla Rutherford
Janina Kuzma, ski mountaineering for North Face Shoot on Franz Joseph Glacier, NZ. Photo by Camilla Rutherford
Essential Gear

I shoot on Canon and I almost always use my Canon 24-70 f2 lens. It’s the most versatile lens when carrying gear and weight is a serious issue. Unfortunately for outdoor photographers who have to hike/ski/climb with gear a pack full of prime lenses is just not possible, unless you are iron woman! F-Stop Gear adventure camera packs and Peak Design clips and straps are also the way to go for anyone shooting outside.’

Find more of Camilla’s inspiring perspective’s on Instagram: @camillarutherford_photography


Part 2 being published soon with more wildly talented and limit pushing photographers.

Feature image by Krystle Wright

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Adventure Travel

Jul 31, 2018

Kayaking’s Elite Return to India at the Malabar River Festival

During the week of July 18th to 22nd, the Malabar River Festival returned to Kerala, India with one of the biggest cash prizes in whitewater kayaking in the world.

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WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

A $20,000 purse attracted some of the world’s best kayakers to the region for an epic week battling it out on some of India’s best whitewater.

The kayaking events at Malabar River Festival were held on the Kuttiyadi River, Chalippuzha River, and the Iruvajippuzha River, in South India on the Malabar Coast. The festival was founded and organized by Manik Taneja and Jacopo Nordera of GoodWave Adventures, the first whitewater kayaking school in South India.

Photo: Akash Sharma

“Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there”

One of the goals of the festival is to promote whitewater kayaking in the state of Kerala and encourage locals to get into the sport. One of the event organizers, Vaijayanthi Bhat, feels that the festival plays a large part in promoting the sport within the community.  “The kayak community is building up through the Malabar Festival. Quite a few people are picking up kayaking… It starts with people watching the event and getting curious.  GoodWave Adventures are teaching the locals.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

Vaijayanthi is not lying when she says the kayak community is starting to build up.  In addition to the pro category, this year’s Malabar Festival hosted an intermediate competition specifically designed for local kayakers. The intermediate competition saw a huge turnout of 22 competitors in the men’s category and 9 competitors in the women’s category. Even the professional kayakers who traveled across the world to compete at the festival were impressed with the talent shown by the local kayakers. Mike Dawson of New Zealand, and the winner of the men’s pro competition had nothing but good things to say about the local kayakers. “I have so much respect for the local kayakers. I was stoked to see huge improvements from these guys since I met them in 2015. It was cool to see them ripping up the rivers and also just trying to hang out and ask as many questions about how to improve their paddling. It was awesome to watch them racing and making it through the rounds. Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

 

“It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake”

Vaijayanthi says the festival has future goals of being named a world championship.  In order to do this, they have to attract world class kayakers to the event.  With names like Dane Jackson, Nouria Newman, Nicole Mansfield, Mike Dawson, and Gerd Serrasolses coming out for the pro competition, it already seems like they are doing a good job of working toward that goal! The pro competition was composed of four different kayaking events- boatercross, freestyle, slalom, and a superfinal race down a technical rapid. “The Finals of the extreme racing held on the Malabar Express was the favourite event for me. It was an epic rapid to race down. 90 seconds of continuous whitewater with a decent flow. It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake.” says Dawson.

Photo: Akash Sharma

The impressive amount of prize money wasn’t the only thing that lured these big name kayakers to Kerala for the festival. Many of the kayakers have stayed in South India after the event ended to explore the rivers in the region. With numerous unexplored jungle rivers, the possibilities for exploratory kayaking are seemingly endless. Dawson knows the exploratory nature of the region well.  “I’ve been to the Malabar River Fest in 2015. I loved it then, and that’s why I’ve been so keen to come back. Kerala is an amazing region for kayaking. In the rainy season there is so much water, and because the state has tons of mountains close to the sea it means that there’s a lot of exploring and sections that are around. It’s a unique kind of paddling, with the rivers taking you through some really jungly inaccessible terrain. Looking forward to coming back to Kerala and also exploring the other regions of India in the future.”

 

For more information on the festival, visit: http://www.malabarfest.com/

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