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Gear

Mar 02, 2018

Advanced Jacket Technology for the Adventurous – Columbia OUTDRY™ Ex Mogul Titanium Jacket Review

Stay Dry, Warm and Mobile with the Columbia Men's OutDry™Ex Mogul Titanium Jacket.

WRITTEN BY

Davey Braun

I venture south from Luxembourg into the snowy mountains of the Bas-Rhin region of France, passing through picturesque towns en route to hike among medieval castles. Given the assignment of creating an unbiased, non-sponsored review of the Columbia titanium jacket, I decided to field test it in the castle lands of France. I filmed my exploration of the Château du Haut-Kœnigsbourg to test the Ex Mogul on a snowy hike in below freezing temperatures.

I park in a wooded area and set out on foot in search of the Château du Haut-Kœnigsbourg, a medieval castle in the Vosges mountain range.

As I step out of the car, I’m hit with a game-time decision: What do I wear underneath the Ex Mogul? The temperature is minus 3 degrees Celsius outside, so if I make the wrong call, I’ll be suffering by the time I reach the castle. Most winter jackets that I’ve owned in the past were a dual system. You pair a thin outer shell with a thicker fleece-lined undercoat. But what sets the Ex Mogul apart is that it’s a hybrid – it includes both the moisture blocking exterior (OutDry™) as well as a warming interior layer (Omni-Heat).

Today, I don’t want to juggle my layers. Typically, I’d get frustrated taking one off as my body heats up, then racing to put it back on when I turn a corner to face the wind. Although I have enough room to wear a hoodie underneath the Ex Mogul, I decide to wear only a T-shirt. There’s no turning back now. If the Ex Mogul can’t handle the cold, then I’ll be testing my mental toughness as well.

© The Outdoor Journal

I hike through knee-deep snow toward the towering structure set atop a rocky outcrop overlooking the Rhine. The morning sun does little to cut through the chill, but I push on. Despite the below freezing temperatures outside, the Ex Mogul does a great job of regulating my body temperature so that I don’t get too hot or too cold. There are ventilation zippers in each side that I can adjust during the peak moments of the hike when my heart is pounding in my chest.

© The Outdoor Journal

The first thing I notice when I slide into the Ex Mogul is that it feels like a soft, comfortable base-layer with a weightless outer shell. My hands slip comfortably into thumb straps or “comfort cuffs.” Honestly, these make me wish that all my clothing had them. The Omni-Heat inner layer efficiently retains body heat, so the overall weight of the jacket is minimal. The fact that it was designed for the Canadian Freestyle Ski Team is noticeable, as I felt free to scramble, climb and move in all directions.

The other thing I notice is that this jacket feels like technology. The advanced insulation on the inside is coupled perfectly with the stretchy, waterproof shell. The exterior of the shell has a resin-like quality, similar to a rainproof tent. Its OutDry™ membrane provides fully waterproof protection, even when drenched in snow. Wearing this jacket almost makes you wish that an ominous black cloud would rush in over the horizon and dump buckets of rain, because it feels so prepared for it.

Pros:

Dryness Guaranteed: Many times in the past I’ve gone skiing and become damp from head to toe even before lunch. So much so, that lunchtime break is not a quick pit stop to refuel – as I could hit the slopes all day – but mostly to dry out my gear by the fire. Those days are staying in the past now, because the OutDry™ technology is so effective that it really does deserve the trademark.

Drivability: When I get into the car with my other ‘fancy-schmancy’ jacket – I immediately rip it off because there is too much fabric to sit comfortably in the driver seat of my SUV. In contrast, the Columbia titanium jacket takes up much less space and allows my arms the range of motion to perform maneuvers on the wheel the way that only I, Tom Cruise and Jason Bourne can.

Comfort: If Christopher Walken was here, he’d say, “You’re gonna want more cowbell!” In that same vein, once you try on the Columbia titanium jacket, “You’re gonna want more comfort cuffs.” They’re a thoughtful addition to the expert design in creating a breathable membrane between you and the elements.

© The Outdoor Journal

Cons:

Tarp Texture: This might not come through in the photos, so I’ll warn you, the outer fabric of the coat is not like other coats. Depending on your taste, you might say that the texture is reminiscent of a rainproof tarp or tent. And if you’re being nasty, you could say its more reminiscent of a trash bag.

Rain Slicker Aesthetic: This jacket isn’t made by Hefty – it’s high-quality Columbia gear designed for expert skiers. But keep in mind that the exterior material makes it feel more ski specific or raincoat specific than for general, casual use.

Semi-fit Compromise: The semi-fitted silhouette could be baggy on certain body types. The jacket wears well on my compact frame. But if you have long arms and you’re on the leaner side of the spectrum, it could be too baggy. Some buyers might prefer a slimmer fit.

Weight: If you’re used to wearing a jacket system that pairs the outer layer with an insulated fleece, then you’ll notice that the Ex Mogul is heavier than your typical outer shell. On the flip side, it’s much warmer than your typical shell.

© The Outdoor Journal

Sustainability:

The Columbia titanium jacket is made from responsibly sourced materials designed to last for many seasons in all kinds of weather. Columbia’s Rethreads program gives customers a discount in exchange for used clothing and shoes (from any brand), which are then donated or recycled. Additionally, Columbia is a member of the Fair Labor Association (FLA), which is an independent nonprofit dedicated to improving the lives of factory workers and providing independent monitoring of factory conditions.

Final Say

The exterior layer of the Columbia titanium jacket feels like an impenetrable barrier to moisture. Meanwhile, the interior feels like a soft, warm base-layer. The jacket is light, fitted and allows for full range of motion. Bring on the rain and bring on the snow!

Specifications:

  • Made in Indonesia
  • Color: Black/Sage
  • Material: [membrane/laminate] OutDry (2-layer), [face fabric] 84% nylon, 16% elastane [lining] 89% nylon, 11% elastane
  • Insulation 60g Omni-Heat Thermal
  • Seams: Fully taped
  • Fit: Semi-fitted
  • Length: Hip
  • Center Back Length: 30in
  • Hood: Removable, adjustable
  • Pockets: [external] 2 zippered hand, 2 zippered chest, 1 pass [internal] 1 goggle, 1 security
  • Venting: Underarm zippers
  • Powder Skirt: Removable, snap back
  • Recommended Use: All mountain riding, all mountain skiing, freeride/powder riding, freeride/powder skiing, freestyle and park riding, freestyle and park skiing, casual
  • Manufacturer Warranty: Limited lifetime

MEN’S OUTDRY™ EX MOGUL JACKET
$269.90
Find out more here

Feature Image © The Outdoor Journal

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Adventure Travel

Jul 31, 2018

Kayaking’s Elite Return to India at the Malabar River Festival

During the week of July 18th to 22nd, the Malabar River Festival returned to Kerala, India with one of the biggest cash prizes in whitewater kayaking in the world.

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WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

A $20,000 purse attracted some of the world’s best kayakers to the region for an epic week battling it out on some of India’s best whitewater.

The kayaking events at Malabar River Festival were held on the Kuttiyadi River, Chalippuzha River, and the Iruvajippuzha River, in South India on the Malabar Coast. The festival was founded and organized by Manik Taneja and Jacopo Nordera of GoodWave Adventures, the first whitewater kayaking school in South India.

Photo: Akash Sharma

“Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there”

One of the goals of the festival is to promote whitewater kayaking in the state of Kerala and encourage locals to get into the sport. One of the event organizers, Vaijayanthi Bhat, feels that the festival plays a large part in promoting the sport within the community.  “The kayak community is building up through the Malabar Festival. Quite a few people are picking up kayaking… It starts with people watching the event and getting curious.  GoodWave Adventures are teaching the locals.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

Vaijayanthi is not lying when she says the kayak community is starting to build up.  In addition to the pro category, this year’s Malabar Festival hosted an intermediate competition specifically designed for local kayakers. The intermediate competition saw a huge turnout of 22 competitors in the men’s category and 9 competitors in the women’s category. Even the professional kayakers who traveled across the world to compete at the festival were impressed with the talent shown by the local kayakers. Mike Dawson of New Zealand, and the winner of the men’s pro competition had nothing but good things to say about the local kayakers. “I have so much respect for the local kayakers. I was stoked to see huge improvements from these guys since I met them in 2015. It was cool to see them ripping up the rivers and also just trying to hang out and ask as many questions about how to improve their paddling. It was awesome to watch them racing and making it through the rounds. Look out for these guys in the future because there are some future stars there.”

Photo: Akash Sharma

 

“It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake”

Vaijayanthi says the festival has future goals of being named a world championship.  In order to do this, they have to attract world class kayakers to the event.  With names like Dane Jackson, Nouria Newman, Nicole Mansfield, Mike Dawson, and Gerd Serrasolses coming out for the pro competition, it already seems like they are doing a good job of working toward that goal! The pro competition was composed of four different kayaking events- boatercross, freestyle, slalom, and a superfinal race down a technical rapid. “The Finals of the extreme racing held on the Malabar Express was the favourite event for me. It was an epic rapid to race down. 90 seconds of continuous whitewater with a decent flow. It was awesome because you had such a great field of racers so you had to push it and be on your game without making a mistake.” says Dawson.

Photo: Akash Sharma

The impressive amount of prize money wasn’t the only thing that lured these big name kayakers to Kerala for the festival. Many of the kayakers have stayed in South India after the event ended to explore the rivers in the region. With numerous unexplored jungle rivers, the possibilities for exploratory kayaking are seemingly endless. Dawson knows the exploratory nature of the region well.  “I’ve been to the Malabar River Fest in 2015. I loved it then, and that’s why I’ve been so keen to come back. Kerala is an amazing region for kayaking. In the rainy season there is so much water, and because the state has tons of mountains close to the sea it means that there’s a lot of exploring and sections that are around. It’s a unique kind of paddling, with the rivers taking you through some really jungly inaccessible terrain. Looking forward to coming back to Kerala and also exploring the other regions of India in the future.”

 

For more information on the festival, visit: http://www.malabarfest.com/

Subscribe here: https://www.outdoorjournal.com/in/subscribe/

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