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The mountains are calling and I must go, and I will work on while I can, studying incessantly.

- John Muir

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Gear

Sep 28, 2017

Rethinking Water with the bübi Bottle

The bübi Bottle wants to be unique in every way—from its look, feel and versatility, right down to its idiosyncratic name with the umlaut and stylized lowercase “b.” And on many fronts, it is a rousing success

WRITTEN BY

Michael Levy

We spent several weeks putting it through the wringer on multi pitch climbs, long hikes and around town in daily life.

The bübi Bottle comes rolled up—one of its more nifty functions. The bottle is made of silicone, which means it is scrunchable and flexible. While I haven’t yet needed to roll it up super compactly, a backpacker trying to cram as much as possible into a small space would surely appreciate this feature.

What I’ve found most convenient is the bübi’s of its sturdiness. Climbing up Mainliner, a 700-foot route in Lumpy Ridge, just above of Estes Park, Colorado, the bübi swung from one of my harness loops. I was slightly worried about it popping at first, but the silicone construction means it bounces and bends without tearing. At one point while still on the ground, I accidentally dropped it off the top of 20 foot boulder, and found it none the worse for wear at the bottom, despite the rock-strewn landing. Neither have all the ice cubes I’ve stuffed inside it caused any punctures. 

Which brings us to another cool thing about the bübi. Being made of silicone, it can withstand temperatures as hot as 500 degrees fahrenheit, and as cold as -100. So if you accidentally drop it in the campfire, you probably don’t need to worry for at least a couple seconds. And if you find yourself in -100 degree fahrenheit conditions, well… what are you doing in a place that cold? Get out of there!

The team at bübi likes to market the bottle as more than a just a water container. Use it as a pillow behind your neck when you’re flying; keep your goldfish or trail mix in it; hell, you can even put your phone in it and use it as a drybag in your kayak (though neither they nor I are not recommending it… if anything happens, that’s on you, buddy).

If you do decide to put your cellphone inside it, you’ll probably want to wash it thoroughly before drinking out of it again, and the silicone construction makes that easy as well: you can turn the bübi Bottle inside out.

Clearly this bottle has a lot going for it.

Then again, you can only get so groundbreaking with a water bottle, and attempting to do so has pitfalls. The most irksome feature of the bübi Bottle is intrinsically related to the design conceit responsible for most of its awesomeness: the pliable, squishy silicone means that, even when the bottle is full, stability is an issue. Even a light graze is enough to unsettle the bottle, which—what with its rounded bottom and lack of overall firmness—is prone to wobble and roll, tilt and fall. I nearly sent my laptop to an early grave while writing this piece when I clumsily reached for my full and uncapped bübi sitting next to me, missed it by a country mile, and spilled water all over the kitchen counter.

Another shortcoming is the carabiner that so niftily holds keeps the rolled up bottle from unfurling. The biner is flimsy and broke on me inside two weeks.

Finally there’s the size. As a climber, 650 milliliters happens to be an ideal volume to bring up a 700-foot climb. For most other activities, I usually want a full liter at least. Lucky for you, bübi also makes a 1 liter size!

The verdict?

All in all, the bübi Bottle is a cool new piece of gear with lots of plusses, negatives that are pretty minor, and a very reasonable price tag. By no means is it a game changer, but it’s definitely worth a look if your ten-year-old Nalgene is now opaque from all the scuffs or your metal Sigg is dented to death. My bottle came in seafoam teal, but the quiver of colors includes  sunset orange, seaweed green, crimson red, gunmetal grey, pacific blue, amethyst purple, and rose pink.

Specs

-Size: 650 ml (22 oz); also available in 1000 ml (35 oz)

-BPA free

-Silicone construction

-Carabiner included

-Comes with an alternative Active Lifestyle Cap

-Microwave and dishwasher safe

-Price: $16.99

-One year limited warranty

Pick up your own bübi Bottle at https://www.bubibottle.com.

And once you do that, try it out on one of the hiking adventures available at The Outdoor Voyage, like this 8-day trip in Croatia!

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Reviews

Jul 03, 2019

Gear Review: Dark Peak NESSH Jacket

Buy one, give one. A Sheffield, UK-based startup outdoor brand brings the one-for-one business model to outdoor clothing.

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WRITTEN BY

Apoorva Prasad

Does the world really need another [insert new clothing or gear item]? After more than a decade as an outdoor journalist and having hit the floor of trade shows year after year, I found it impossible to show any kind of genuine excitement or interest over the latest [insert marketing-driven fancy-word-for-a-zip-or-waterproof-layer]. For years now I’ve been content with a few pieces I’ve acquired over the years that have proven their worth. A bomber Millet down jacket for hardcore use, an Arcteryx ultra-light shell for alpine climbing among others. The cold, hard truth is, apart from the invention of some very lightweight and strong fabrics, incrementally improved waterproof-breathable inserts and coatings; clothing technology has not significantly advanced in the last decade or so. Whatever we do, 99% of the consumer population who buy outdoor gear or clothing don’t need anything beyond what already exists and has existed for a while. Making and buying new stuff simply perpetuates a flawed economic model that encourages consumerism and is bad for the planet.

So what the world does need is a better business model.

When Dark Peak reached out to us to do a review of their Kickstarter-launched NESSH down jacket, we were, therefore, intrigued not because of the impressively complete tech specs of the product itself, nor the genuine credentials of the team – those were a given for any new product today – but by their mission and business model.

  1. A reasonably priced jacket that sells direct to consumers – unlike mainstream brands, built around a lot of marketing and distribution costs, requiring the company to sell even more simply to justify their model.
  2. Buy one, give one away to someone who really needs it. Just like well-known consumer brands Tom’s and Warby Parker, Dark Peak donates a new jacket (via homeless shelters) for every jacket sold on their website.
Press Photo

This model is not new, of course, given that Tom’s has been doing it since 2006. However, the outdoors industry – a USD 800+ billion behemoth – has, for the most part, refused to leverage its size to genuinely do good in the world. So it was a refreshing change to hear Dark Peak’s pitch and note their Kickstarter success.

Cut out the expensive retail spaces, middle-men, third-party licensing fees and so on, and you get a high-quality product (it is made in Asia, like all other major brands) at something like half the price.

The jacket they give away is not the same as the one you buy, of course. It’s non-branded and made with different, less performance-oriented but equally warm, weather-resistant materials. Given our own beliefs at The Outdoor Journal, we felt this deserved a real review.

Dark Peak launched the jacket on Kickstarter, blowing past their goal of £15,000 to eventually raise £107,084.

It took a little while to get my hands on the actual jacket – shipping couriers seemed to have some problem with my address in Helsinki, Finland, which is where I tested it over the winter. In other words, yes, the weather was cold.

I received a maroon colored, lightweight NESSH (UK S, US XS size) jacket that came with some very positive first impressions. The build quality and shape were almost better than I initially expected. But I was genuinely struck by the weight or lack thereof. A 340g winter jacket is very, very light indeed. It comes complete with details that are more common in the higher-end models of more mainstream and expensive brands. Integrated wrist gaiters with thumb loops? Check. Two-way YKK zips? Check. 10D Nylon shell inside and outside? Yep. 850 fill down with hydrophobic coating? Check. (The company says that the down is “responsibly sourced” and certified by Responsible Down Standard). You can also choose to get the same jacket with 3M synthetic insulation too, should you prefer that (or spend more of your outdoor time in wetter conditions).

The jacket is clearly made for outdoors people (in other words, shaped to fit your body, and not built like a rectangular sack, unlike many a brand. I find it almost impossible to fit in many other jackers, which, understandably, seem to be built for people who have bulging middles and larger waists than shoulders).

If you haven’t spent time in Helsinki, Finland, well, the weather in winter is a bit weird. It can go from -20 C to 0 C overnight – and then repeat the thermometer yoyo again and again. It was almost disconcerting to have such a lightweight jacket on while going about daily life, but it worked as long as it was not too deep in the negatives. More importantly, it worked while I was active, including a bit of skiing and ice-skating – in fact, it was a great deal more lightweight, athletic and comfortable than most of the major brand-name jackets I’ve used or own. That may relate to the fit and cut – in general, I fit better in the UK or European brands than US ones, which is a function of body type – but it felt like the Dark Peak team had made an effort to build a product that is genuinely for outdoor enthusiasts, and not the average retail consumer (think about it – bigger brands need to sell to the widest possible audience to maximize revenues and profitability). While I haven’t taken it on an all-day, multipitch climb yet, so far it really feels like this may soon become my favorite warm layer to have with me, assuming the jacket survives the shred. I’m really quite curious to put it through the serious beating in my pack and up a climb, later in the year.

Press Photo

Dark Peak’s jacket genuinely feels like a very high-quality, ultra-light high-end 850 down jacket, the kind you’d usually buy from a well-known brand like The North Face or similar and expect to pay nearly twice as much for. And the fact that they’ve indeed gone with the one-for-one business model, makes Dark Peak’s NESSH a jacket we’ll recommend without hesitation. Go buy yours on their website here.

Pros: A highly affordable, high-quality technical jacket backed by a purpose-driven business model.

Cons: The website feels incomplete and buggy. The athletic cut and shape and technical nature of the jacket may not be for everyone, or appropriate for business meetings!

Rating: 5/5.

Full Disclosure: The Outdoor Journal received one NESSH jacket for the purpose of this review.

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