logo

The mountains are calling and I must go, and I will work on while I can, studying incessantly.

- John Muir

image

How-To

Jun 24, 2019

Dealing With Dietary Restrictions In The Backcountry.

Gluten intolerance, vegan, Halal, nut allergy, dairy-free, Kosher… whatever your dietary restrictions may be, you don’t have to let it hinder your ability to get out and enjoy the backcountry!

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

We spoke with expedition whitewater kayaker, Ben Stookesbury, about his experience of maintaining a vegan diet on long kayaking expeditions. As a guy that needs to hike to remote rivers, nutrition, to maintain endurance is key. As Ben’s puts it “I began going after rivers that had not yet been explored, and quickly realized the endurance component of carrying a heavy kayak – sometimes days into a wild river or around unrunnable stretches of river – was the key to the mission”.

Read Next: Adventuring On A Plant-Based Diet With Ben Stookesbury

We took Ben’s advice and put together some tips for dealing with your dietary restrictions in the backcountry.

Photo: Brooke Hess

Preparation is Key

It’s easy to head to REI and buy the pre-made freeze-dried backpacker meals. They are easy to prepare, lightweight, and a quick cleanup. The cons? They are expensive, kinda gross, and most likely don’t comply with your food intolerances or restrictions! So, instead of doing that, just prepare your own meals!

Plan your meals ahead of time, so you know exactly what ingredients to shop for before you go on your trip. Crack a bunch of eggs into a nalgene for scrambled egg dinners. Portion out oatmeal, nuts, dried fruits, and chocolate chips into a ziplock for breakfasts. Make your own granola bars, jerkey, and bread for sandwiches. Know exactly what food you will eat for each meal while you are in the backcountry, and prep it accordingly.

For Stookesbury, planning and preparing his meals before a long trip “takes some focus and forethought… but it feels quite empowering to be so much more cognizant of what I am putting in my body, and obviously there is simply no longer the need to eat much of anything that has all those nasty preservatives.”

Go With Good People

Unfortunately, some people are not as accommodating of food restrictions of others. I can’t say why, but some people think of food restrictions as “picky eating” and “high maintenance”, rather than a serious medical need or a spiritual belief. The fact that you may get seriously sick from eating gluten, or go into anaphylactic shock from your food being near peanut butter might not quite register on their radar. It doesn’t mean they are a bad people, but it might mean you avoid going on long backcountry trips with them in the future.

Alternatively, there are many people out there who are WONDERFUL to plan trips with. They will go out of their way to make sure you have the food you need, and will often sacrifice their own meal plan in order to include you in the group cooking. These people are the best, and you should keep them in your contacts for future backcountry trips. Sharing food and coordinating meals with the group will save both time and weight while carrying food into the backcountry, so going with good people who don’t mind accommodating your dietary needs is key!

Photo: Brooke Hess

Make Time For Three Full Meals A Day

No NOLS-style meal plans here. Stookesbury says one of the most important parts of expeditioning is “planning the time to eat three tasty meals a day.”

Give yourself enough time in the morning to cook up a hot breakfast. Plan a one hour stop mid-day to prepare a sandwich or wrap for lunch. Give yourself enough time in the evening at camp to cook a meal of veggies, protein, and carbs. Without the ease of the freeze-dried backpacker meals, you will have to put more time into your meal prep. But don’t worry, you’ll be happy you did when you are eating a freshly-prepared meal of roasted veggies and quinoa!

SNACKS SNACKS SNACKS!

Find a bar that works for you. And if you can’t – make your own!

I have spent the past year searching for the best gluten free and dairy free bars. I want the maximum amount of calories and protein, in the smallest possible package. As soon as I found one I liked, I ordered it in bulk on Amazon. I now have a stash of 50+ energy bars in my truck ready to be packed into a drybag, backpack, or ski jacket as soon as the need arises.

If you can’t find one that works with your diet, or can’t find one that you like – make your own! Any combination of dried fruits, nuts, oats, honey, and dark chocolate can make a damn good energy bar. You can find recipes online for homemade bars, then substitute various ingredients to make it work with your diet.

Stookesbury prefers the trail mix method to energy bars. “Nuts, dried fruit, and vegan chocolate is my personal substitute for an energy bar, and I call it a homemade energy bag! Keeping that ‘Power Bag’ of nuts, dried fruit, and some quality chocolate is a good way to keep your energy up and make snacking easy.”

Other popular snacking favorites include jerky, chocolate-covered almonds, cheese sticks (if you can eat dairy), and nut butters.

Photo: Brooke Hess

Be Prepared To Carry More Weight If Needed

I recently met a woman who has developed a severe allergy to all red meat, due to a bite from a Lone Star Tick. If she eats beef, pork, lamb, or any other red meat, she goes into anaphylactic shock. Even if her food is cooked in the same cast iron pan that has recently been in contact with red meat, she could go into anaphylactic shock. For these reasons, whenever she embarks on a backcountry expedition, she brings all her own cookware (and an EpiPen, just in case). She has learned to be adamant about her dietary needs on trips, and often prepares her food separate from the group. She is well aware that her food restrictions might force her to carry more weight than other members in her group, but that hasn’t stopped her from continuing her pursuit of overnight expeditions!

Photo: Brooke Hess

Examples of Day-Long Meal Plans for Various Diets:

Stookesbury’s Favorite Backcountry Vegan Meal Plan

Breakfast -150g oats, chia, flax, pumpkin seeds, hemphearts, raisins and walnuts (add a little salt).

Snack – Powerbag (nuts, dried fruit, vegan chocolate)

Lunch – Hummus, veg (arugula, beet, carrot, avo) sandwich

Dinner – 150g Rice, lentils, broccoli, onion, garlic, with or without nuts, salt, and olive oil.

 

TOJ’s Favorite Backcountry Gluten-Free and Dairy-Free Meal Plan

Breakfast – Pre-cut kale scrambled with eggs, avocado, and vegan “cheese”

Snack – Bobo’s gluten free oat bars, apple, and dairy-free dark chocolate peanut butter cups

Lunch – Gluten free tortillas with peanut butter and jelly

Dinner – Roasted root veggies (sweet potato, beets, carrots, potato), kale, and quinoa, topped with avocado and vegan “cheese” if preferred.

Photo: Brooke Hess

Introducing The Outdoor Voyage

The Outdoor Voyage booking platform and online marketplace only lists good operators, who care for sustainability, the environment and immersive, authentic experiences. All listed prices are agreed directly with the operator, and we promise that 86% of any money spent ends up supporting the local community that you’re visiting. Click the image below to find out more.

Continue Reading

image

How-To

Sep 28, 2019

Learn How to Climb Like Alex Honnold (but with a rope!)

With the success of Free Solo and climbing's admission into the 2020 Olympics, interest in this sport has never been higher, so here are 5 simple steps to do it for yourself.

image

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

You’ve just finished watching Alex Honnold’s Free Solo on El Capitan. Your hands are sweaty from holding onto the armrest so tight, your jaw is sore from clenching your teeth together, and you feel slightly nauseous from the knot that has formed in the pit of your stomach. But despite all the physical symptoms of anxiety you are experiencing, you still feel that aching urge for an experience. It doesn’t need to be exactly what Honnold is doing… a rope and belay partner would be nice! But you are curious. You start by googling “Rock Climbing”. Then “Yosemite”. Then “Yosemite Rock Climbing”. You soon realize you are in way over your head.

So, how do you start? How do you get into rock climbing?

Hopefully, this guide will help you figure out where to start.

Step 1: Find a local climbing gym

Google “rock climbing gym in _(your hometown)_”. Find a friend who also wants to try it out, and go! Don’t bother buying any gear yet. You can rent it there.

When you arrive at the climbing gym, make sure to express to the gym employee that it is your first time, that you have no idea what you are doing, but you are excited to learn! They will most likely be able to point you towards a class, clinic, or private lesson that will teach you how to tie into the rope for safety, how to belay, and several simple climbing techniques.

Your first time climbing (before you take a class) will most likely be a bit of an ego hit. The gym employee will most likely give you a pair of rental climbing shoes and lead you towards the easier bouldering routes. These routes are shorter walls over padded flooring. You don’t need a rope for bouldering, which makes it more accessible to beginners. However, due to the walls being shorter, the routes are often set to be more challenging. They are often more powerful and require better technique than roped routes. For this reason, your first time climbing might be difficult. But don’t be discouraged! This is how it goes for everyone.

Step 2: Take a clinic

Your local gym will most likely host various classes and clinics throughout the week to teach belay skills, climbing techniques, and strength training. Sign up for a belay class, take a technique clinic, and go from there!

Step 3: Buy some gear

Climbing gear can be bought in phases. Phase one is the beginner gear kit – shoes, chalk, and a chalk bag.
Go to your local gear shop – preferably a climbing-specific shop if there is one near you, get an employee to help you, and try on as many different brands, sizes, and models as you can. Every style of climbing shoe will fit your foot differently, which is why it is important to try on different styles and sizes to make sure you get the right one for your foot shape and size.

Phase two of climbing gear is buying a harness, belay device, and locking carabiner. Do this after you have taken a belay clinic, so you know how to safely tie in and use the ropes at the gym, and how to use a belay device.

Next stop, El Capitan!

Phase three will happen once you start leading and climbing outside. You might start out by just buying a rope and a set of quickdraws, but as you develop your climbing skills, you will slowly start buying more gear. Helmet, more shoes, a new carabiner, a rope bag, more shoes again, daisy chain, a new backpack… and eventually you will start building a trad rack, and your simple life as you know it will be over and all you will think about is climbing.

Step 4: Get a membership to the gym (and hopefully make friends while you are there)

The best way to get good at a new sport? – Do it a lot!
Get a climbing gym membership and go 4-5 days a week. Boulder, top rope, lead, whatever you want to do while there… just go! Try all the routes – not just the ones that you can easily finish – but all of them. Challenge yourself to step outside of your V0-V2 comfort zone and hop on a V4 or V5. Watch how other climbers move their bodies and position their feet to make the moves, and copy them. You might learn some cool techniques that make the routes easier and more fun.

While at the climbing gym, try to make some friends! Maybe post in a local climbing Facebook page that you are a newer climber looking for belay partners at the climbing gym, and possibly looking to learn how to climb outside as well. Most climbing communities are very friendly, and people are often stoked to take out new climbers and show them the ropes (pun intended)!

Step 5: Go outside!

Now that you have found a solid group of friends to climb with, get outside!

Next stop, El Capitan!

Cover Photo: The author, Brook Hess. Photo by Gillian Ellison.

Recent Articles



New World Record: Nirmal Purja Summits the 14 Highest Peaks in Just 6 Months

Nepali ex-soldier Nirmal Purja just smashed the record for summiting all the 8000ers in just half a year—the previous record? The same achievement took Kim Chang-ho, over seven years.

Book Review: Tales from the Trails

From the top of the world to the end of the earth, essays from a marathoner’s odyssey to compete on every continent and the lessons learned of friendship, life and pushing past borders

The Undeniable Beauty of Poland’s Gory Stolowe National Park

Visitors will find a rare-looking, 70 million year-old untouched land with rock formations and wildlife in this anomalous European landscape.

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary

Advertising

Analytics

Other