The countdown is on for the 2017 ISA World SUP and Paddleboard Championship. After the success at Cloudbreak in Fiji last November, this year it’s changing scenery (not to mention temperature) and going to Europe for the first time in Denmark’s Copenhagen and ‘Cold Hawaii’ from September 1-10.

Photo taken by Miguel Sacramento while covering the championship in Fiji for The Outdoor Journal last November.

Keeping everyone on their toes—and hopefully boards, the International Surfing Association continues to promote and expand this quickly growing sport by holding this year’s World Championship in Denmark’s stunning capital city, Copenhagen and Vorupør on the northwest coast. Also known as Cold Hawaii, Vorupør is celebrated for its excellent wave conditions and unique surf & SUP culture.

Photo courtesy of Copencold Hawaii

Following a fourth win for Australia in Fiji in 2016, over 300 paddlers from over 30 countries will be taking part in prone paddleboarding, SUP racing and SUP surfing disciplines to find out who is going to be crowned the 2017 ISA World Champions.

Denmark has 7,500km of stunning coastline which can be reached in a two-hour drive from anywhere in the country. Cold Hawaii’s excellent conditions and the accessibility of the coast have given the sport significant momentum in recent years and SUP has become a popular discipline for many across the country.

Triple SUP Racing World Champion, ISA Vice President and Chairman of the ISA Athletes’ Commission, Casper Steinfath, who is from the Cold Hawaii region of Denmark, said:

Cold Hawaii is a special place in the heart of Denmark for Surfing and StandUp Paddle. This region has cultivated some the country’s top athletes and I cannot wait to welcome the World Championships to our shores. Visiting SportAccord today in my home nation and being able to demonstrate the sport that I love and what Denmark has to offer, is a wonderful moment for me.

Over recent years, SUP has greatly advanced in professionalism and popularity and much of that success is a result of the work conducted by the ISA. Following Surfing’s Olympic inclusion, the ISA has been able to offer so much to SUP, organizing the World Championships, helping to fund development schemes and instructor courses, and bringing a voice to our discipline that can be heard by more people globally.

Will anyone be up to the challenge of ending Australia’s winning streak? Stay tuned to see how the competition unfolds!

It might not be competing for a world title, but the opportunity to SUP through the rainforest sounds pretty good to us too!

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