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Events

Oct 04, 2018

Adventure Uncovered Live Returns: October 13, 2018 at The Crystal, London.

Igniting the Passion for Social and Environmental Action. Bringing the adventure community together for an inspirational day of talks, panels, activities, film and photography.

WRITTEN BY

The Outdoor Journal

This year’s Adventure Uncovered Live includes a packed schedule from the industry’s leading and most progressive speakers, activists and brands including a National Geographic explorer, the co-founder of The Do-Lectures, plus The Thames ProjectGlobal Warming Images and Sail Britain. It’s an opportunity to learn from the trailblazers who are paving the way to a more sustainable future, the challenges they’ve faced and the victories they’ve achieved.

“Our event provides an inspirational platform to catalyse change,” says James Wight, Founder of Adventure Uncovered. “We encourage new narratives, thought provoking and difficult conversations, because only through breaking down barriers can real progress happen. That’s why we exist and we hope attendees leave feeling as passionate about the world we live in, as we do.”

HOW INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS AND NEW BUSINESS MODELS ARE TRANSFORMING THE OUTDOOR SECTOR.

In a keynote session, Andy Middleton, co-founder of TYF Adventure and Do-Lectures, will host a panel that discusses the latest steps being taken by the adventure industry to embed environmentally and socially sustainable practices across their organisations and products. This enables us to make the most sustainable choices when planning our next adventure.

“Experienced outdoor enthusiasts and explorers are smart about researching, caring for and knowing how to use the gear that their lives depend on” writes Middleton. “In the same way that a rope, axe or buoyancy aid protect us when we stumble, nature protects us where we stand and live. Never before has there been a need to protect our environment for the long term with the same diligence that we protect ourselves when exploring, learning and playing in wild places.” 

HOW ADVENTURE AND PHOTOGRAPHY ON THE FRONTLINE CAN CREATE CATALYSTS FOR CHANGE.

Environmental Photographer Ashley Cooper will also be speaking at the event, and showcasing his powerful images (including the cover photo of this article). Ashley has travelled to the remotest reaches of every continent to document the impacts of climate change and the rise of renewable energy. This epic, thirteen-year journey set out to gather evidence of our changing climate and what humanity must do to save itself from destruction. Ashley moves from evidence gathering and documentation through to motivating climate action amongst global leaders (including Pope Francis, Al Gore and Chris Packham) via his award-winning book, “Images From a Warming Planet”.

Other talks and topics include ‘The Role of Film in Communicating Adventures with a Purpose’, ‘How Adventure and Photography on the Frontline Can Create a Catalyst for Change’, and ‘‘The Future of Adventure: What Trends Lie Behind the Corner?’.

The official charity partner for the event is The Running Charity, an organisation that uses running to improve the lives of 16-25 year-olds who are homeless or at risk of homelessness across the UK.

HOW YOU CAN TAKE PART.

Adventure Uncovered Live takes place on October 13, 2018 at The Crystal, London one of the world’s most sustainable events venues and home to the largest exhibition on the future of cities and sustainable development. (Complimentary access to the exhibition is also included for all attendees).

Standard tickets start from £30 and there is an option to join in a stand up paddleboard adventure and clean-up of the Thames the morning of the event. You can purchase you tickets here.

A drinks reception will also close the event giving attendees the opportunity to meet with the day’s speakers and connect with like-minded, adventurous people who care about making a positive difference to world we live in.

For more information, visit www.adventureuncoveredlive.com.

Cover Photo: Ashley Cooper

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Athletes & Explorers

Feb 07, 2019

Mountaineering Scene Mourns the Loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry

The bodies of the highly experienced Scottish climbers were recovered on Wednesday following a fatal fall on Ben Hope in the Highlands.

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WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

Andy Nisbet (65) and Steve Perry (47), two highly experienced members of the Scottish Mountaineering Club, died while climbing Ben Hope this past week. Mountaineering Scotland, an organization for climbing enthusiasts in Scotland, said they were “shocked and saddened” to learn of the deaths of Nisbet and Perry. “Their deaths are a huge loss to the mountaineering community in Scotland.”

“He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures”

Ben Hope is Scotland’s most northerly Munro. Munro is the name given to a mountain in Scotland above 3,000ft. Nisbet and Perry were working on establishing new winter routes on the mountain when they experienced difficulties in their descent and ultimately fell to their deaths. Andy Nisbet is considered the most successful mountaineer to come out of Scotland. He has established over 1,000 winter routes and is extremely well-respected within the climbing community. Mountain guide and author, Martin Moran, spoke highly of Nisbet. “Andy Nisbet is obsessive and fanatical, but he is also a delightful person, and he is an all-around mountaineer. He has also, for a lot of his career, been a full-time instructor. He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures, including new routes.”

“Climbing in Scotland is still my favorite”

When interviewed about expeditions abroad, Nisbet replied, “Climbing in Scotland is still my favourite.” Though he is known for his contributions to the development of Scottish climbing, Nisbet has also contributed a fair amount to routes around the world. “Andy has made an enormous contribution to Scottish mountaineering, but it mustn’t be forgotten that he has also made a contribution to Himalayan mountaineering as well,” says Martin Moran.

“Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!”

Andy Nisbet was known for continuing to pursue new routes and high alpine ascents well into an age where most climbers retire. At age 65, he was still establishing new routes on Munros and climbing as strong as ever. In a video by Dave MacLeod at the Fort William Mountain Festival, Nisbet was quoted saying, “Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!” He mentioned wanting to continue climbing as long as is physically possible. “I hope I’ll be able to go to the hills for a long time… It’s hard to know whether climbing will outlast walking. I used to think I would still hill-walk when I stopped climbing, but actually, you can carry on climbing for possibly longer than hill-walking. It just depends on which parts of the body give up first!”

Andy Nisbet swinging hard. Photo: Masa Sakano.

Steve Perry was also a well-known and highly experienced mountaineer. He had completed an on-foot round of the Munros in addition to his numerous impressive summer and winter climbing ascents. Perry had recently partnered with Nisbet to develop new winter routes on Ben Hope.

The International climbing community is mourning the loss of both climbers today. Cameron McNeish tweeted, “Utterly devastated this morning at the news of the loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry on Ben Hope. Both were gargantuan and inspiring figures in Scotland’s mountaineering scene. A massive loss to us all.

Cover Photo: Image copyright – Dave McGimpsey

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