logo

What’s the use of a fine house if you haven’t got a tolerable planet to put it on?

- Henry David Thoreau

image

Athletes & Explorers

Oct 08, 2018

Maya Gabeira: The First Female Big Wave Surfer Recognized with the World Record

This Brazilian surfer has just become the first female surfer to be recognized by Guinness World Records for a biggest wave surfed

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

On January 18th, 2018, Maya Gabeira successfully rode a 68-foot tall wave in Nazaré, Portugal.

The height of the wave was confirmed by The Portuguese Surfing Federation´s Technical Director, Miguel Moreira, “This is the female record. There is no doubt about it.”

Gabeira grew up in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, where she started surfing at age 14. At age 17, she moved to Hawaii to pursue her passion for surfing. Supporting herself with two different waitressing jobs, she still managed to find enough time to train, and on February 6th, 2006, rode her first big wave. A 35-foot tall wave at Waimea Bay, on the North Shore of Oahu, marked the beginning of many big waves that Gabeira would surf.

Maya Gabeira, The Discovery of Nazare

A wipeout broke her ankle, herniated discs, ripped off her lifevest, and left her face-down, unconscious in the water.

Gabeira has surfed waves all around the globe, including Indonesia, Australia, South Africa, Northern California, and Tahiti. Her mentor, Carlos Burle, also of Brazil, introduced her to tow-in surfing, which has given her the means necessary to surf some of the world’s largest waves. Gabeira is a 5-time World Surf League Big Wave Awards winner, as well as the winner of the 2009 ESPY Best Female Action Sports Athlete Award.

In 2013, Gabeira had a near-death experience while surfing big waves in Nazaré, the same place she set the world record. A wipeout broke her ankle, herniated discs, ripped off her lifevest, and left her face-down, unconscious in the water. She was rescued and resuscitated on the beach.

Despite this brush with death, five years after her crash, the Brazilian surfer completed her comeback. On January 18th, 2018, Gabeira realized her goal of surfing the world record largest wave when she successfully towed onto and rode a 68-foot tall beast.

Gabeira knew this wave was a women’s world record, but she wasn’t receiving recognition for it. The World Surf League and Guinness World Records has previously only recognized and awarded the big wave world record to men. Gabeira was fighting for a women’s category as well. “It is essential to have a separate record,” Gabiera told The New York Times.

“Women have to fight to get their space where it’s supposedly just a man’s world”

In order to gain recognition as a world record, the World Surf League must first approve. Gabeira attempted contacting the organization, but received no response. She traveled to their office in Los Angeles and spoke with them directly. For several months her request was ignored. She eventually took matters into her own hands by enlisting the help of her fans and followers on social media.
The following is a quote from a video she posted to Facebook, asking for help with a petition to the WSL for a separate female world record category.

“Hello, I’m Maya Gabeira. I’m a big wave surfer from Rio de Janeiro and I need your help. On January 18, 2018 I achieved my life’s goal of surfing the biggest wave a woman has ever surfed.
In order to establish a world record, I need the World Surf League to certify the measurement of the wave. For some reason, the WSL has ignored my request. Please sign this petition to ask the WSL
to recognize a world record for women in big wave surfing!”

Link to Maya’s petition: https://www.change.org/p/world-surf-league-a-world-record-for-women-in-big-wave-surfing

The petition received more than 18,000 signatures, and caught the eye of the WSL.

On October 1st, 2018, Gabeira won her fight and was awarded the Guinness World Record.

 “Women have to fight to get their space where it’s supposedly just a man’s world. So, if you scream loud enough then you get heard. And that’s what happened.” Maya Gabeira explained to Public Radio International.

Cover Photo: Maya Gabeira performs during a big wave surfing session at Praia do Norte in Nazare, Portugal on October 21, 2017. Photo: Redbull.

Continue Reading

image

Athletes & Explorers

Oct 15, 2019

Tony Riddle Crosses Great Britain Barefoot but Not Broken

Natural Lifestyle coach Tony Riddle put his rewilding practices to the test by running 874 miles across Great Britain entirely barefoot to support environmental sustainability.

image

WRITTEN BY

Davey Braun

Tony Riddle has done it. He completed the challenge that he set out for himself on the first of September – to run barefoot across the island of Great Britain. Tony ran from Land’s End, the Southern tip of the UK, to the northernmost village of the mainland of Scotland. Originally, the idea was to run 30 miles per day for 30 days; however, as the old saying goes, “Man plans, and God laughs.” The Outdoor Journal sat down with Tony to discuss his barefoot journey and the disconnect between modern living and our true potential as humans. (You can listen to the full podcast episode here).

In his daily life, Tony coaches people to live a more natural lifestyle and feel better in their bodies. He points out small changes that people can make to massively improve their quality of life in the office, at home and most importantly, outside – from sitting positions, to squatting, to walking posture, to running technique and beyond. Some of the central tenets that we can all experiment with are breath work, meditation, cold immersion, mobility, movement and a plant based diet. To learn more about Tony’s ancient, yet avant-garde rewilding practices, check out our 4-part series Rewild with Tony Riddle.

Tony’s feet after four days running 30 miles per day barefoot on the roads across Great Britain.

Tony committed to run across Great Britain, in part, to set an example of just what amazing things the human body is capable of doing. But he was also driven to raise awareness and support for modern sustainability practices. He selected six organisations that are making a difference, and you can find a link to donate on his page. Each day, Tony broke the 30 miles down into three sets of 10 miles, in the breaks, he sat down with environmentalists to discuss practices to conserve our environment for the next generation. Tony cares deeply about the planet’s future. He has three children, and together, they supported his month-long journey alongside Tony and his wife Katarina, who was pregnant with another one on the way.

Tony with his wife Katarina and three daughters after completing the 874 mile journey from Land’s End to John O’Groats.

If you followed Tony’s Instagram stories on his journey, then you were swept up in the rollercoaster ride of emotions as well. Early on, Tony seemed invincible, as he gleefully sang songs about his daily mileage. But after a week, the wear of the road took its toll. Tony sustained a cut on his foot that looked like a centuries-old jagged crack in bedrock. Tony’s foot and ankle swelled up so much that it more closely resembled a sack of potatoes than a foot. Tony bravely shared his deep frustration and sorrow in his decision-making process to take rest days, which forced him to run back to back ultra-marathons on the final two days of September, finishing with a 47-mile day 29 and a 57-mile day 30. He pushed through the last half mile “in absolute agony,” as he said in his story, accompanied by his daughters, who looked up at him with absolute pride.

Tony on day 28 with 100 miles left to go.

Looking at this challenge through a periscope, outside of time and space, Tony wouldn’t have wanted it to be easy. Deep in his soul, he asked for each and every painful step. Through the process of overcoming, Tony shared powerful tools with his audience that he used to drag himself out of the “pain cave,” as he calls it, and back into the light. For more of Tony’s insights, listen to the full discussion on The Outdoor Journal Podcast.

To connect with Tony, visit tonyriddle.com

Facebook: @naturallifestylist
Instagram: @thenaturallifestylist
Twitter: @feedthehuman
Youtube: Tony Riddle

Subscribe to The Outdoor Journal Podcast for more stories like this.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Articles



Forrest Galante: The Modern-Day Charles Darwin

Except biologist Forrest Galante is not searching for the origin of species, more like auditing the books, and in a few very successful instances, erasing names from the roster of extinction.

Trans Himalaya 2019 – Part 3: The Invaluable Treasures of Ladakh

After the onset of the Northeast monsoon in the lower Himalayas, Peter Van Geit moves on to the high altitude rock desert of Ladakh in the Jammu and Kashmir region.

#VanLife Survival – What I’ve Learned While Living On The Road

Tips and Tricks for Successful #VanLife Living, from important preparation, through to everyday tasks and the right approach to your lifestyle.

Privacy Preference Center

Necessary

Advertising

Analytics

Other