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Inveniam viam aut faciam

- Hannibal Barca

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Athletes & Explorers

Feb 07, 2019

Mountaineering Scene Mourns the Loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry

The bodies of the highly experienced Scottish climbers were recovered on Wednesday following a fatal fall on Ben Hope in the Highlands.

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

Andy Nisbet (65) and Steve Perry (47), two highly experienced members of the Scottish Mountaineering Club, died while climbing Ben Hope this past week. Mountaineering Scotland, an organization for climbing enthusiasts in Scotland, said they were “shocked and saddened” to learn of the deaths of Nisbet and Perry. “Their deaths are a huge loss to the mountaineering community in Scotland.”

“He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures”

Ben Hope is Scotland’s most northerly Munro. Munro is the name given to a mountain in Scotland above 3,000ft. Nisbet and Perry were working on establishing new winter routes on the mountain when they experienced difficulties in their descent and ultimately fell to their deaths. Andy Nisbet is considered the most successful mountaineer to come out of Scotland. He has established over 1,000 winter routes and is extremely well-respected within the climbing community. Mountain guide and author, Martin Moran, spoke highly of Nisbet. “Andy Nisbet is obsessive and fanatical, but he is also a delightful person, and he is an all-around mountaineer. He has also, for a lot of his career, been a full-time instructor. He has introduced literally thousands of people to winter climbing and has given them terrific adventures, including new routes.”

“Climbing in Scotland is still my favorite”

When interviewed about expeditions abroad, Nisbet replied, “Climbing in Scotland is still my favourite.” Though he is known for his contributions to the development of Scottish climbing, Nisbet has also contributed a fair amount to routes around the world. “Andy has made an enormous contribution to Scottish mountaineering, but it mustn’t be forgotten that he has also made a contribution to Himalayan mountaineering as well,” says Martin Moran.

“Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!”

Andy Nisbet was known for continuing to pursue new routes and high alpine ascents well into an age where most climbers retire. At age 65, he was still establishing new routes on Munros and climbing as strong as ever. In a video by Dave MacLeod at the Fort William Mountain Festival, Nisbet was quoted saying, “Equipment is improving all the time, so my grade is not dropping!” He mentioned wanting to continue climbing as long as is physically possible. “I hope I’ll be able to go to the hills for a long time… It’s hard to know whether climbing will outlast walking. I used to think I would still hill-walk when I stopped climbing, but actually, you can carry on climbing for possibly longer than hill-walking. It just depends on which parts of the body give up first!”

Andy Nisbet swinging hard. Photo: Masa Sakano.

Steve Perry was also a well-known and highly experienced mountaineer. He had completed an on-foot round of the Munros in addition to his numerous impressive summer and winter climbing ascents. Perry had recently partnered with Nisbet to develop new winter routes on Ben Hope.

The International climbing community is mourning the loss of both climbers today. Cameron McNeish tweeted, “Utterly devastated this morning at the news of the loss of Andy Nisbet and Steve Perry on Ben Hope. Both were gargantuan and inspiring figures in Scotland’s mountaineering scene. A massive loss to us all.

Cover Photo: Image copyright – Dave McGimpsey

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Why We Do This

Apr 22, 2019

Earth Day and Earth Week: What Can you Expect From The Outdoor Journal?

Why the world's biggest environmental movement is important to us, an introduction to the Outdoor Voyage, and a sneak peek of The Outdoor Journal's Earth Week content to come.

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WRITTEN BY

The Outdoor Journal

“To educate and inspire all people to experience, enjoy and protect wilderness.”

This is The Outdoor Journal’s mission statement, and during Earth Day and Earth week, when appropriate levels of attention are being paid to the state of our world, and its plight, we will do everything that can to harness that momentum.

The Outdoor Journal is a call to action. We believe in clean air and blue skies. We believe in unpolluted rivers and plastic-free oceans, in pristine rainforests, clean beaches, green hills and open grasslands. We believe in living sustainably, ethical lives, in respect of the planet that has always provided for us. We believe in one Earth, with no nationalities and invented borders. We believe in saving whales and sharks, tigers and orangutans, bears, bees, baobabs and blackwoods. We believe in saving forests and wilderness areas now whilst we still can.

Australian ultra-runner Samantha Gash ran across India to raise money for education in India. The Outdoor Journal partnered with her and asked our ambassador Jonty Rhodes, former South African cricketer and coach, to help highlight her cause.

As you are here, reading this, we hope that you believe in the same thing.

Over the course of the next week, we are going to publish great content so that we play our part in raising awareness. The below will turn to links when each article is published:

Introducing The Outdoor Voyage

Whilst you’re here, given you believe in our mission, we would love to introduce you to The Outdoor Voyage – our booking platform and online marketplace which only lists good operators, who care for sustainability, the environment and immersive, authentic experiences. All listed prices are agreed directly with the operator, and we promise that 86% of any money spent ends up supporting the local community that you’re visiting. Click the image below to find out more.

Cover Photo: A ‘Blue Marble’ image of the Earth taken from the VIIRS instrument aboard NASA’s most recently launched Earth-observing satellite – Suomi NPP. This composite image uses a number of swaths of the Earth’s surface taken on January 4, 2012. The NPP satellite was renamed ‘Suomi NPP’ on January 24, 2012 to honor the late Verner E. Suomi of the University of Wisconsin.
Image Credit: NASA/NOAA/GSFC/Suomi NPP/VIIRS/Norman Kuring

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