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Athletes & Explorers

Jul 10, 2019

Alone Across Antarctica Part 1: Unbreakable Colin O’Brady Achieves the Impossible Once Again

A recovery from disaster gave Colin O'Brady the strength to cross Antarctica with muscle power alone on his 1000 mile solo journey - another world record.

WRITTEN BY

Davey Braun

Earlier this week, The Outdoor Journal announced a 5-part Alone Across Antarctica series featuring interviews from some of the greatest polar explorers of all time, including Captain Louis Rudd, Borge Ousland and Mike Horn. In this first instalment, multiple world record holder Colin O’Brady discusses his heroic journey from suffering in a hospital bed in Thailand to accomplishing awe-inspiring endurance expeditions around the globe.

On November third, 2018 Colin O’Brady set out to accomplish an “Impossible First” by becoming the first person to cross Antarctica on a solo, unsupported, human-powered journey.

Colin’s world record ambitions chartered a trifecta of challenges: Colin faced a 1000 mile journey alone, hauling all of his supplies, using only his muscle power.

Colin was not the first person to ever reach the South Pole, nor complete a continental crossing of Antarctica – Norwegian Børge Ousland did so without resupply, but with the aid of wind power using a kite in 1997 – but Colin was the first to battle the hurricane-like winds and sub-freezing windchill under all three criteria – solo, unsupported and completely human-powered. In recent years, other explorers attempting this crossing have failed and even died.

As Colin puts it, “We called the project ‘The Impossible First’ because many people have attempted this project, it’s in the zeitgeist of the adventure community for a long time and there’s a lot been written on the fact that it may be impossible.”

With no option for food or gear drop-offs, Colin loaded a nearly 400-pound pulk, or sled, with everything he needed to survive over the next 54 days.

Simultaneously, British explorer, Captain Louis Rudd attempted the challenge under the same stipulations in what would become a two-month race across the continent.

If you run the calculus on the challenge, taking into account the 1000-mile distance from the Ronne Ice Shelf to the Ross Ice Shelf, Colin would need to haul his 400-pound pulk for 12 hours a day to reach an average of over 18 miles covered per day. As every pound mattered, Colin did not even pack a spare set of underwear. He completed the journey without taking a rest day, finishing the last 77 miles in 32 hours in an ultra-marathon finish.

In the media coverage surrounding the race to the record books, some other accomplished explorers, as well as some desk-warrior journalists, have disparaged Colin’s claim to “The Impossible First,” citing discrepancies between his route selection and that of previous explorers, to which Colin replies, “I just smile and move on.”

The Outdoor Journal linked up with Colin to discuss his unbreakable mindset, how this challenge stacked up against his other world-records, and his place amongst the pantheon of polar explorers.

A WORLD RECORD CAREER

TOJ: Last time we connected, you were in the middle of the 50HP challenge of reaching the tallest point in all 50 states in just 21 days, a new world record. While you were attempting that record, did you have in the back of your mind this next goal of crossing Antarctica or did you get home and take a look at the world map to figure out what was next?

Colin O’Brady: No, I’ve been working on this project for well over a year so I knew for certain I was doing it when I did 50HP.

TOJ: How would you describe the difference between the 50HP challenge when you had a support team in your RV and people meeting up to run alongside you, bringing new energy to keep you going, versus enduring the remote isolation of Antarctica?

Colin O’Brady: Yeah, no pun intended, but certainly polar opposites of experiences for sure. We also thought it through that way, which was like, “Wow, we’re going to do two projects this year, wouldn’t it be fun to do one where there’s a whole bunch of people and community around it, on the ground community involvement?” And then, of course, the exact contrast to that, which was Antarctica and the solo expedition.

“The bigger message is about putting that positivity out in the world and having that ripple effect, that inspiration for other folks following along.”

It sounds like you followed along both of those projects so you know the bigger message is certainly about putting that positivity out in the world and having that ripple effect, that inspiration for other folks following along. So in that way they’re similar just in terms of the storytelling and the modalities of sharing that with young people and people all over the world.

They are also extremely different obviously, getting dropped off that day, November third, on the Ronne Ice Shelf. I’m watching the plane fly away and there’s no one out there. It’s a whole different experience and definitely a huge wave of emotion to be in that solitude for 54 days and ride the storms, both external and internal inside the mind.

TOJ: You’ve accomplished multiple world records now. How does the Antarctica crossing rank amongst your other ones in terms of difficulty?

“I would say the Antarctica crossing, particularly because it’s the world’s first, is probably my proudest accomplishment.”

Colin O’Brady: They’re all distinct in my mind. I would say the Antarctica crossing, particularly because it’s the world’s first, is probably my proudest accomplishment. There’s something about doing something that no one in history has ever done before that adds a degree of excitement to the challenge because of the unknown element. In terms of difficulty, people ask me, “What was harder, this or climbing Everest?” They’re just so different from one another in that, with the polar exploration, you never have a day off. I never took a day off in 54 days. And so it was just this grinding repetition of harsh environment and long days pulling the sled.

When you look at Himalayan mountaineering, the summit days, or some of those bigger days to the high altitude are extremely hard, potentially a lot harder than maybe the hardest day in the polar environment. But half the time you’re hanging out in the base camp with a cooking tent, when it’s not super cold and you’re just resting for many days to acclimatize.

And then if you take the 50HP, for example, some of those mountains on the East coast were half a mile little walk ups. Going to the highest point in Florida wasn’t particularly hard, but those last eight days of that project to put in almost 200 miles on trails with 150,000 feet of climbing over 10 different locations in an RV with no sleep – that section was extraordinarily hard. So for me, I don’t really rank them against each other in terms of which was the hardest. They are all different experiences and all that I’m really proud of.

TOJ: I know from watching your Youtube Channel that you did extensive physical training before the expedition, but how were you able to train or prepare yourself for navigating in a whiteout or putting your tent up in a 50 mile an hour wind?

Setting up the tent in high winds and whiteout conditions.
It often took Colin two hours to fully set up his tent.

Colin O’Brady: I think a lot of this is iterative from other adventures and other expeditions that I’ve done before and there’s certainly a step into the unknown of things I haven’t done before. Lou Rudd, who I have a great deal of respect for and camaraderie with at this point had done two major expeditions in Antarctica previous to mine, with his expedition with Henry Worsely in 2011 and his traverse with his six army mates (including a resupply) at the South Pole. He’s put that time in Antarctica. I only had one very much shorter expedition in Antarctica just covering the last degree in 2016, and I’ve been to the North Pole, so both of those gave me a little bit of that specific polar experience. But after the 50 High Point and before Antarctica, I also did a crossing of Greenland, with the exact purpose of testing all my gear and testing all of my systems.

My entire mountaineering and adventuring career has been learning from other people around me. As a kid, I loved to climb. I had some family friends who were Outward Bound instructors and I always liked going out in the mountains with them and asking them a million questions. How do you carry your pack? How do you light the stove? And now I love to pass down a lot of those skills to other people who are excited about getting outside.

UNBREAKABLE MINDSET

TOJ: Your story reads like a superhero comic book (or perhaps the movie Unbreakable) where you suffered an accident in Thailand with burns over 25% of your body, then you were able to recover and start racing triathlons and then keep pushing yourself further and further. How much strength did you gain from your recovery experience and what kind of transformation did you go through? If you had not had the accident, would you be doing the Antarctica crossing?

“The pain, both physical and emotional trauma, that I experienced was so severe that I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy.“

Colin O’Brady: It was a hugely pivotal moment in my life being burned in that fire and the ultimate recovery. On one hand, the pain, both physical and emotional trauma, that I experienced was so severe that I wouldn’t wish that on my worst enemy. That said, coming through the other side of that, particularly surrounded with my mother who put this positive energy reverberating around me at the time and dared me to set a goal, which ultimately ended up in me winning my first triathlon and my professional athletic career as a result of that.

Colin recovering in the hospital in Thailand after suffering severe burns to both legs.

“As humans, we have these reservoirs of untapped potential inside of us and we can achieve such amazing things.”

In that moment when I won that triathlon 18 months after being told I would never walk again, this feeling overcame me like, “Wow, as humans we have these reservoirs of untapped potential inside of us and we can achieve such amazing things.” And it gave me this inner strength to realize that no matter how bad a situation is, mentally, physically, emotionally, etc., that if you keep putting one foot in front of the other, you can really achieve extraordinary things. I don’t think that I’d be doing these expeditions necessarily because life would have gone in a different direction had I not been burned in that fire.

Out there in the middle of Antarctica, with the wind 60 miles per hour, with minus 25, minus 30 ambient temperature which makes the wind chill something ridiculous like minus 75 or something, and still getting out of my tent everyday to pull my sled 12 plus hours, there’s this mantra that I have, which is this, “This too shall pass.” I remind myself, you were burned, lying in a hospital and told you would never walk again. Now you’re out here doing this. The impermanence of all of those challenging moments allows me the mental strength and fortitude to keep pushing in the hardest moment and realize that there’s relief and success on the other side of that persevering.

TOJ: Do you mentally transport yourself back into that mindset when you’re out on a challenge?

Colin O’Brady: I definitely remember distinct moments, not only in Antarctica, but also climbing in the Himalayas and on my multiple Denali ascends. When it’s getting really hard. I can recalibrate. I’m like, “This is super hard, but man, this is not the hardest thing you’ve ever gone through before.” And I pictured myself in that hospital bed screaming, writhing in pain, being so far away from home in that unsanitary hospital. I’ll know that this is a tough situation right now depending on how cold it is or how windy it is or how tired I am, but I’ll know that I’ve gotten through worse.

THE IMPOSSIBLE FIRST

TOJ: When you were breaking down this challenge of crossing Antarctica and doing the math of how much food you needed to carry and how many miles you needed to cover each day, what made you believe that it was possible to accomplish and how much margin of error was there?

Colin O’Brady: I’ve been thinking about this project for a couple of years and I really started focusing on it when (my wife) Jenna and I submitted to doing all the steps to prepare for it about a year ahead of time. And when we sat down together to think through the challenge, certainly something that people have written about, is this possible after Henry Worsely passed away, after Ben Saunders failed by running out of food, is it even possible to do this challenge? Really it’s kind of a big math equation. How heavy of a sled can you pull for how big of a distance? At a certain weight, your sled would be too heavy in the beginning because you’re not getting resupplies so you wouldn’t be able to even move it at all. How many calories are going to be burned? What are the necessities in addition to food and fuel that need to be in the sled?

Colin’s camp, a tiny spec on the White Continent.

We approached it in a really analytical way and to be honest, when you run the math on it, the reason I think it has been said, at least previously, that it wasn’t possible is that the margin for error is really slight. You cannot bring a lot of extras. I didn’t even bring an extra pair of underwear because an extra 100 food calories in my sled made more sense to me than any extra creature comfort that I could have out there.

When I finished the project, I had very little extra food and fuel. I probably could have stretched it a little bit longer, but it’s not as if I had several weeks of margin for error. And I didn’t take a single rest day throughout. So if you add in one or two rest days, which can be totally normal to do, you’re not looking at much excess at all.

RACE TO THE RECORD BOOKS

TOJ: When you bumped into Captain Rudd beforehand, did you guys make any sort of gentleman’s bet about turning each of your separate endurance challenges into a race?

Colin O’Brady: No, I think it’s just an implied race. Before the project, we both were very publicly saying we intended to be the first person to make this crossing and there’s only one season to be able to do this, and one logistics operator facilitating, it was very clear that we were going to be starting on the same day in the same location. So the race element was implied. Not only were the two of us racing history, trying to be the first in history after other failed attempts, but of course, since we were both out there at the exact same time, it was going to be a head to head race.

TOJ: If Captain Rudd wasn’t there, do you think you still would have attempted that ultra-marathon push at the end, covering the last 77 miles in 32 hours?

“As someone who is fascinated by finding and stretching the limits of human capacity and potential, I decided to commit to that and go for it.”

Colin O’Brady: Oh, absolutely. One hundred percent. That last push was not really a function of Lou being out there. At that point, I was about 30 plus miles ahead of him with only a few days to go and I’d been ahead of him since day six. I’d been ahead of him for nearly 50 days at that point and felt pretty confident about my lead, assuming I could keep moving relatively full days if you get to the end. That final push was more a function of me trying to push my limits and see where the limit of my own capacity was and I didn’t really plan for it at all. I just woke up that morning on Christmas morning and said, “Maybe I should push a longer day because I thought I had three days remaining.” I thought at my normal rate I could do it in two days with two really big pushes if the weather holds and if my body holds up to it. And in the first hour, I got locked in and it hit me, “What if I didn’t stop at all?” Is it possible to keep pushing all the way to the end? As someone who is fascinated by finding and stretching the limits of human capacity and potential, I decided to commit to that and go for it. And sure enough, 32 hours and 77 miles later, I found myself crossing the finish line.

TOJ: Although you and Captain Rudd each did your own journey solo, do you feel that you formed a special bond with each other? You waited an extra two days after your finish for him even though you could have been in a hot shower and fresh clothes two days earlier.

“When we were finally flying back to Punta Arenas, we were able to move past the competitiveness of this and look each other in the eye and acknowledge what we both accomplished.”

Colin O’Brady: Absolutely. We didn’t know each other before this and we didn’t meet until the day before flying down to Antarctica. And given the competitive nature of the environment and the quote-unquote race, there was certainly a competitiveness to the both of us. But when I finished 54 four days into my journey on December 26th, I had the opportunity to call up the logistics operator and try to get a plane out of there immediately. After being tired and low on food and exhausted and all of that, certainly, there’s an appeal to just being done. But that never really crossed my mind. I was really clear. I wanted to wait at the finish line for Lou to complete his crossing, which he did about two and a half days after I finished, so I could share this moment with him and have him be the first person that either of us see because there’s seven billion people on the planet, but he’s the only other person that has completed this specific crossing in this traverse. I have the utmost respect for him. He’s an extraordinarily accomplished polar explorer. To have this bond and the comradery of doing this is great. By the end of it, when we were finally flying back to Punta Arenas, we were able to move past the competitiveness of this and look each other in the eye and acknowledge what we both accomplished.

Colin meets up with Captain Rudd after 56 days apart journeying across Antarctica.

TOJ: Besides Captain Rudd, who are some of the other explorers from previous generations that you’ve looked up to for inspiration?

Colin O’Brady: The day after I finished the project, while I was waiting for Lou, I made a post on social media entitled “Standing on the shoulders of giants,” acknowledging a lot of people that have inspired me over time.

Of course, there’s the turn of the century pioneering polar explorers, which I’m just in constant awe of – Amundsen, Scott and Shackleton in that era.

And then moving more into the modern era with Børge Ousland, Dixie Dansercoer, Dixie is a dear friend of mine. He helped mentor this project. He’s done incredible things and taught me a lot over the years.

Ryan Waters happened to be at Union Glacier right when I finished and he and I have known each other over the years from being in different places around the world doing adventures.

And certainly Felicity Aston, I’ve never met her, but her traverse, although it was supported, was really pioneering in 2012.

TOJ: What were some of your most difficult and challenging days? I talked to Captain Rudd and he said if he had to plan it again, he would have definitely not gone on the South Pole Overland Traverse (SPOT) because the way that the snow was filling in it was actually a pain. But it’s got to be frustrating to see some of the other explorers say that the SPOT is groomed by big vehicles and has some markings which might actually take away from your record. Can you set the record straight on that?

Without music to distract him, Colin traveled deeply inward while hauling his sled for 12 hours each day.

Colin O’Brady: I think Lou said it perfectly and I agree with him that regardless of whether people who weren’t out there want to diminish what we’ve accomplished, for me, I just smile and move on. I know what I accomplished is something that no one in history has ever done, and to echo what Lou said, with the way that the wind was blowing and the drifts and the whiteouts, the rutted up ground on the SPOT in a lot of ways made it even more challenging.

In the same way that Felicity Aston has been widely recognized for what she did in 2012, to go up the Leverett Glacier, we did the same thing, just in the opposite direction. But she received two resupplies. No one during that time was diminishing her accomplishment. She’s written a book about it. She’s been praised as the first woman to traverse the continent, as she should be. It’s an extraordinary accomplishment. So for me to hear other people’s echoes of small criticism, I’d rather just lean into the positivity of the 99.9% of people in the most reputable media sources like the New York Times and National Geographic and CNN, etc. acknowledging this as a great accomplishment. And I know what I did is something unique and special that no one else accomplished before in history.

TOJ: And another point of contention is that in not including the ice shelves themselves, it diminishes the crossing record, but in doing research, I’ve read on Adventurestats.com that permanent ice doesn’t count as the geographic border. And also speaking with Captain Rudd, it seems like it’s a matter of plane logistics and also insurance that makes it impossible to land on the ice shelves now, unless you have your own vessel like Mike Horn. Would you agree with that?

Colin O’Brady: The logistics are extraordinarily challenging. I’m not one to say it’s impossible, but man-hauling that distance without the use of kites is very challenging and I hope someone can figure out the logistics and has the physical ability to do that at some point, I will be applauding their success. Not to diminish what either Mike Horn or Børge Ousland, or what some other people have done when they have crossed the ice sheets, I think it’s really amazing, but they did so using kites and it’s a pretty significant advantage to use kites to propel you. For me, it’s not one project being better than the other or harder than the other, they’re all extraordinary, but they’re just different. Like using kites to pull you across the distance is very different than what Lou and I set out to do, which was across the landmass of Antarctica using completely our own human power. All of their projects previously are inspiring to me and there’s enough room in this world for all these differences to be applauded.

Colin poses for a photo at the geographic South Pole.

REFLECTING ON PAST AND FUTURE

TOJ: You described in one of your interviews a lucid dreaming experience where you got to spend extra time in your own memories, which sounds to me like an Ayahuasca experience where you reflect on your own life. Have you been able to implement those lucid memory experiences and the lessons you’ve learned once you returned back to your normal life?

Colin O’Brady: Absolutely. I’ve accessed those types of lucid memories a few other times in my life, mostly during the really long silent meditation retreats where I go in 10 days in the silence – no reading, no writing, no eye contact – and really dive deeply into the mind, which of course was great preparation for this project, which ultimately was like a 54 day walking meditation, silent experience, alone in the middle of Antarctica. Every single time I tap into that wakening lucid dream or flow state or whatever word you want to call it, has been deeply profound because it reminds me that every piece of my life has made me who I am now.

The view from Colin’s tent, completely isolated from his friends and family thousands of miles away back in Portland.

And it also allows me to reflect on different relationships and different experiences in my life and there’s so many lessons that I get out of that. For me, I’m an avid journaler and I’m always reflecting on personal growth. So the most important thing in all of this is not the accolades, not the interviews or the press or anything like that, it’s my personal growth and the ability to integrate those lessons into my life in a meaningful way. And hopefully as a result of that, it allows me to have a larger impact across the world to excite and inspire, as I become a more complete person from these experiences as well.

TOJ: Do you see more polar expeditions in your future?

Colin O’Brady: Antarctica is a special place and even the small amount of time that I spent up on the Arctic ocean, in my North Pole expedition in 2016, there’s no place like that with the ice moving and shifting. It’s such a unique landscape. I’m still getting home and still enjoying a warm bed and clean clothes, but I can’t help but let my mind drift off to amazing memories of Antarctica. Any adventurer will probably tell you about the classic type-two fun – once you’re back and warm for a period of time and you start to remember all the beautiful nostalgia of the experience and forget all the hardships and the pain, and before you know it, you’re back out there pushing yourself. I don’t have anything on the immediate horizon to return for a polar expedition in the next 12 months but I’m only 33 years old and I’m fascinated by exploring these landscapes in unique and different ways and I definitely can see myself back on there at some point.

Visit Colin’s website The Impossible First
Twitter: @colinobrady
Instagram: @colinobrady

Stay tuned to The Outdoor Journal for the next installment of our Alone Across Antarctica series. 

  1. Monday 8th July: Introducing Alone Across Antarctica Series 2019
  2. Wednesday 10th: Unbreakable Colin O’Brady Achieves the Impossible Once Again
  3. Monday 15th: For the Love of the Journey: An Interview with Captain Louis Rudd
  4. Wednesday 17th: Nowhere to Hide on Antarctica: Børge Ousland’s World Record Legacy
  5. Monday 22nd: Mike Horn’s Race Against Time
  6. Wednesday 24th: The Impossible Truth on Antarctica

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Athletes & Explorers

Jul 17, 2019

Alone Across Antarctica Part 3: Nowhere to Hide – Børge Ousland’s World Record Legacy

Norwegian legend Børge Ousland, who navigated unknown landscapes in 1997 to become the first person ever to cross Antarctica alone, has a message for would-be record breakers.

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WRITTEN BY

Davey Braun

In a 5-part series Alone Across Antarctica, The Outdoor Journal connected with the greatest living polar explorers to discuss their solo missions across Antarctica, the most inhospitable environment on the planet. In Part 1, Colin O’Brady detailed his most recent world record attempt. In Part 2, Captain Louis Rudd explained what it took to survive his simultaneous 56-day journey. In this installment, Børge Ousland recounts the first-ever solo crossing of Antarctica and shares his perspective on the latest record-breaking attempts.

Børge Ousland is a Norwegian explorer and adventurer, among the best who have ever lived. As the first person ever to cross both poles on solo expeditions, Børge is a leading expert on polar exploration.

Børge became the first man to complete a solo and unaided journey to the North Pole in 1994. Then in 1997, he made the first solo and unaided crossing of Antarctica from coast to coast, covering 1,864 miles (2,845 km) from the edge of the Ronne Ice Shelf to the edge of the Ross Ice Shelf. In his world-first solo crossing of Antarctica, Børge set out from Berkner Island in the Weddell Sea and reached the McMurdo base by the Ross Sea 64 days later, hauling a 390 pound (178-kg) sled. He used a windsail to help propel him on parts of the journey.

Børge is so dedicated to polar exploration that he even held his wedding ceremony at the North Pole in 2012, flying in guests via helicopter.

The Outdoor Journal connected with Børge to discuss his solo crossing of Antarctica, a world’s first, and how the latest record attempts by Colin O’Brady and Captain Louis Rudd stack up in the history of polar adventure.

WORLD’S FIRST SOLO CROSSING OF ANTARCTICA

TOJ: What initially inspired you to attempt the first solo crossing of Antarctica?

“We all have that need to overcome something difficult in life.”

Børge Ousland: That trip was up for grabs back in the day. I had skied across Greenland. I skied solo to the North Pole in ‘94, that was my big test. In polar conditions, you’re up there in the elements fighting yourself, overcoming difficulties and problems, and it’s just you, and you have to find these solutions and answers. And that’s fascinating for me. But the bottom line – the platform I’ve built my expeditions on – is adventure. I always liked the outdoors. I like to ski, I like to sleep in tents, I like to be physical, to move around, and be in the “here and now” in nature.

Børge Ousland hauled a 178 kilogram sled across Antarctica for 64 days.

The good part with the expeditions is that you are here and now. You focus on the weather, the equipment, the progress and not something that is going to happen tomorrow, which is more or less what we’re doing in daily life.

It’s also fascinating to look at something that nobody has done before and think, “Maybe I can do that.” Then you start to think about it and then finally you get that belief in yourself that, “Yes, I can do that!” And then you make it into a plan and you go. So it’s not about being first or greatest, it’s about overcoming something. I think we all have that need to overcome something difficult and get those victories in life.

This project is not just a trip starting from when you put your skis on. It’s one year of preparation and it’s the whole package, which fascinates me. It actually took me two years to do it. I went there in ‘95 but suffered blisters and frostbite, which got infected, because my gear was not windproof enough. After skiing solo and unaided only to the South Pole on that trip, I still thought I could do it, so I spent another year arranging sponsorship, training, pulling rubber tires, optimizing my equipment, and then I went again in ‘96 and I made it.

TOJ: Some of the explorers that inspired you were Amundsen and Nansen, who worked in teams. What drew you to take that extra step to go for a solo journey?

“Going solo is a mental experiment, it’s inner travel.”

Børge Ousland: In ‘93 I was on an expedition with my friend and we got separated in a whiteout. I wondered how it would be to be out there just by myself. So that’s how I first got the idea to go solo. Before I started on my solo trip to the North Pole in ‘94, I had never spent one night alone in a tent. I think that was a big mental leap. For me, going solo is mostly interesting from a mental and philosophical point of view. Physically, it’s more heavy to go solo because with a partner, you can share the tents and the common equipment, but overall it’s more or less the same. Going solo is a mental experiment, it’s inner travel. It’s hard because you can’t share the memories and joke with your partners but on the other hand you have a totally different dialogue with nature and yourself because there is no one to lean on.

Børge Ousland setting up overnight camp on Antarctica.

TOJ: Before a trip, is there any way to replicate or train for that sense of isolation?

“When the helicopter left me on Antarctica, I never felt so small in my whole life.”

Børge Ousland: I don’t think so. Actually, I did go to a sport psychologist who helps athletes win gold medals in the Olympics. I got a little bit fed up with him because he was just asking questions while I wanted to hear tangible tips on how to make it. But he understood that the point of asking all these questions was actually the right recipe because the whole deal was to make me get to know myself better, because on the South or the North Pole, there is nowhere to hide. You meet yourself. Good sides and bad sides. Feeling alone, or afraid of not succeeding, those feelings will come. If you accept that these feelings are a part of yourself, you’re in a better position to deal with them. So the answer is in yourself. But nothing could prepare me for when the helicopter left me there on Cape Arctichesky on my first solo trip. I never felt so small in my whole life.

A TRUE COAST TO COAST ROUTE

TOJ: Can you explain the process of selecting your route from Berkner to McMurdo, and the difference between your route and the one selected by O’Brady and Rudd?

“On the South Pole, there is nowhere to hide. You meet yourself. Good sides and bad sides.”

Børge Ousland: I planned my route based on aerial photos taken by the US Navy back in the 1950’s and 60’s. I just had a little copy of the images from that era with me and my map was 1 to 250,000 so I was just probing unknown landscapes down there.

I never considered going from the bottom of the mountains (like O’Brady and Rudd did). It always stood out to me as a very artificial route because it’s glacier ice, it’s not sea ice. Those ice shelves have been there as long as 100,000 years and that’s longer than those low lying countries like Denmark and Holland. So these ice shelves are ancient and they are part of the inland side. It doesn’t matter if you take away the ice and there is water underneath, which was found out later. I wanted to go from sea to sea. Berkner had been established by a couple other expeditions before. And I knew that it was possible to get out from McMurdo. So I paid a ticket for a cabin on a cruise ship, for several thousand dollars, that would leave from McMurdo in perfect timing with my expedition.

Illustration of Antarctica Solo Crossings; created by Eric Phillips, President of the International Polar Guides Association.

TOJ: Some of the more recent expeditions like Ben Saunders, Henry Worsely, and now Colin O’Brady and Captain Louis Rudd have chosen the inland start on a route that is about half as long as yours. Do you feel like this modern route is a legitimate crossing of Antarctica?

“Many have done the inland start, but you can’t claim an Antarctic Crossing.”

Børge Ousland: It’s a great trip, but it’s not going from coast to coast. Many have done the inland start, and it’s a great way to go to the South Pole, but you can’t claim an Antarctic crossing. You can see it more clearly when you look at a map. They are deleting the shelf ice from the map when they draw it, it looks like ocean. When Colin O’Brady came down on the shelf ice he said, “Now I am on sea ice.” But he’s not, he’s on one-kilometer thick glacier ice which is part of Antarctica. When you see a real satellite image of Antarctica, then you see the true extent of both ice and land. I have a great respect for their achievements but I don’t approve and I don’t have any respect for their claims.

Solo journey’s are more physically taxing because you have to create your own tracks.

TOJ: I tried to research the official guidelines for what constitutes a polar crossing and I found one source which is Adventurestats.com which said, “The start point has to be from a boundary between land and water – the coastline. Permanent ice is considered part of the ocean, not the land.” Which is kind of confusing to me. It seems like it should be the opposite. What is the source for the official guidelines for polar records?

“So it’s not impossible and it’s not the first.”

Børge Ousland: Those guys who made that definition, they did the inland start themselves, and they obviously had a reason for calling that the coast. So those things will be changed in the future. This isn’t something that’s just come up now. I’ve been fighting this battle for over 20 years. I think it was Ranulph Fiennes who was first to call the bottom of the mountains the coast, but his partner Mike Stroud disagreed with that. They were not able to make it all the way to McMurdo and they were totally wasted, so they stopped at the bottom of the mountains and said, “Well, let’s call this the coast and we can claim to be the first unsupported crossing.” And it’s been a controversy ever since. But it’s very good that social media has caused all this interest because people suddenly start to think about it with transparency and finally we can do something about it.

TOJ: One of the things I’ve been trying to make sense of is the “Messner start” because as I research it, I found out that it was not the point that Reinhold Messner was trying to start from, but it was an alternate start point based on a logistics issue with the plane. So is it a misnomer to call that the “Messner start?”

Børge Ousland: Reinhold Messner, he wanted to start from the coast. The guys who flew him had some logistical problems. That was a big issue. He wanted to sue them. He got so delayed so there was no other alternative than starting from where he started. But he definitely did not call that the coast.

TOJ: I read that he was actually furious that he was forced to change his plans.

Børge Ousland: Yeah he was, big time. I think they paid back some money to close the case. So it’s not impossible and it’s not the first.

WHAT CONSTITUTES “ASSISTANCE?”

TOJ: One of the other guidelines on Adventurestats.com says that using tracks created by a motorized vehicle is considered support and it seems like the South Pole Overland Traverse (SPOT) might constitute tracks created by motor vehicles because the big trucks groom the traverse. If that is the case, would that take away O’Brady and Rudd’s “unsupported” claim?

Børge Ousland: Sure it’s support because you can double the distance on that road and you don’t need to worry about navigation. There’s a flag every four-hundred meters, and crevasses are filled up, and you can ski blindfolded there actually. There is no danger at all and it’s so much easier to ski there than going on the side with sastrugi where you have to navigate yourself. They will never be able to claim that trip as unsupported.

Crossing the North Pole in 1994, Borge used simple equipment such as a compass and decades-old aerial photos to navigate.

TOJ: Do the official definitions of “support” and “assistance” make sense to you?

Børge Ousland: They want to change that now. It’s still in early parts of the discussion, but they wanted to change it to “assisted” or “unassisted” only, then if you have a sail or you have dogs or whatever, that’s just a method of transportation that will be noted under the expedition. So either you’re first or you’re not first, and whatever comes after is just a different way of doing it.

TOJ: O’Brady and Rudd are trying to make a distinction between other solo expeditions like yourself and Mike Horn by saying that you used the assistance of wind power, and that’s why they’re saying it’s a first because they didn’t use any device aside from human power.

“On the first trip to the South Pole in ‘95… I didn’t even have a radio.”

Børge Ousland: For me, the bottom line for being supported or not is if you have some outside help. It’s between being totally self-reliant or not. And then method of transportation is secondary. Because you could always walk instead of ski. Is ski “support?” If you stand on top of a hill, and you let yourself go, you will move forward if you have a ski. It’s just about using the techniques that are available to you to move forward. I never considered that using a ski sail, which I did on parts of the trip, would be a controversy in the future. I couldn’t use it on the way to the South Pole because of the headwinds and I couldn’t use it in other parts because of the sastrugi. Then some guys made up their own definitions of doing a traverse that is the first-ever “unsupported” and “unassisted,” thinking normal people will never know the difference, then it sounds like you’re the first ever to do it, and that’s actually what’s written in the papers.

TOJ: O’Brady and Rudd covered over 900 miles. Do you know what percentage of that was on the SPOT groomed road?

Børge Ousland: As far as I know, it’s half the trip.

I think the main thing for me is to get the truth out and I think these guys did great trips and I fully respect their achievements both in the distance and experience they had, but I’m not approving the claiming of first solo crossing and unassisted. That will never happen that I will agree with that.

TOJ: Do you think that there are some still possible first ascents out there?

Børge Ousland: Yeah, there is: to cross the North Pole solo and unassisted. Because I crossed the North Pole solo but I had to resupply because my sled broke. So that’s still up for grabs.

Børge Ousland enjoying the journey across Antarctica.

SOCIAL MEDIA IMPACT

TOJ: One of the benefits of social media is it allows you to stay in touch with people who care about your journey and also your friends and family. I’m wondering, have you ever looked back and wished that you had social media on one of your earlier expeditions, so you’d be able to stay in touch with people and they’ll be able to track your progress, or do you think that that takes away from the isolation element of any adventure?

Børge Ousland: I’m still doing expeditions for the IceLegacy Project, which I do with Vincent Colliard from France, and every night in the tent we have one to two hours of office work (laughs). I think back on my big solo trips when I didn’t have a sattelite phone, and actually on the first trip to the South Pole in ‘95 when I didn’t even have a radio. I was just by myself for two months. Absolutely no outside contact. I think it was good just to be there with nature and concentrating on my journey and myself.

A LASTING LEGACY

TOJ: Can you describe the origin of the concept behind the Legacy Project and the significance of it on a global scale?

Børge Ousland: It is a very important project. It came about after I circumnavigated the Arctic in 2010. Me and a few friends sailed around the Arctic in a trimaran in four months through the northeast and northwest passage. Those areas used to be clogged with ice and it took six years to do it just a few decades ago. It really shocked me how much the ice had retreated in the Arctic. That’s what sparked this idea to cross the 20 greatest glaciers on Earth, to show what is happening with them, because almost all the glaciers in the world are retreating, contributing to sea-level rise. We want to document and tell the story of what’s happening. Our role is creating awareness as eyewitnesses. And secondly, we have two goals, we want to inspire people to get out in nature, that’s the best way to preserve it. And we’ve done nine glaciers now. Read more about the Legacy Project.

Learn more about Borge Ousland on his website. www.ousland.no/
Instagram: @borgeousland
Facebook: @borgeousland

Stay tuned to The Outdoor Journal for the next installment of our Alone Across Antarctica series. 

  1. Monday 8th July: Introducing Alone Across Antarctica Series 2019
  2. Wednesday 10th: Unbreakable Colin O’Brady Achieves the Impossible Once Again
  3. Monday 15th: For the Love of the Journey: An Interview with Captain Louis Rudd
  4. Wednesday 17th: Nowhere to Hide on Antarctica: Børge Ousland’s World Record Legacy
  5. Monday 22nd: Mike Horn’s Race Against Time
  6. Wednesday 24th: The Impossible Truth on Antarctica

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