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The mountains are calling and I must go, and I will work on while I can, studying incessantly.

- John Muir

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Athletes & Explorers

Dec 05, 2018

Stephanie Gilmore’s 7th WSL World Title and a Wave of Attention that is Bigger than the Men’s

Three months after announcing equal pay for men and women, the World Surf League celebrates Stephanie Gilmore’s 7th World Title.

WRITTEN BY

Brooke Hess

On September 5th, 2018, the World Surf League announced plans for equal pay in men and women’s surf competitions in the 2019 season. This announcement was a huge step forward, not only for women’s surfing, but for women’s sport in general. The WSL had set the standard for equal pay in athletics.

Stephanie Gilmore (AUS) the WINNER of the 2018 Corona Open J-Bay at Supertubes, Jeffreys Bay, South Africa. Gilmore now wears the Jeep Leader Jersey after beating Lakey Peterson (USA) in the Final and takes over the Yellow Jersey from Peterson (USA). Photo: World Surf League.

This past year, the WSL had received negative feedback after a photo went viral of the Billabong Ballito Pro Junior Series male champion being paid twice as much as the female champion. Most social media users were upset with the pay disparity at the event, commenting on the photo as “blatant inequality” and “archaic discrimination”. However, some social media users argued in favor of the unequal payout. They argued that men’s athletics are viewed in the media more than women’s athletics, therefore bringing in more revenue, and justifying the pay disparity. A social media user commented on the Billabong Junior Series surf photo saying, “Surfing, like most sports is a predominantly male sport. More people watch the men’s surfing, more men surf than women.”

THE CHICKEN OR THE EGG?

Many people would ask, do more people watch men’s surfing because it is actually more interesting? Or, do more people watch men’s surfing because that is what the media has always streamed, and thus, audiences are more accustomed to watching the men’s style as opposed to the women’s? Valeria Perasso at BBC News puts it well, “audiences will not get excited about women’s sport as it gets minimal exposure in the media, and the media would justify the lack of coverage by saying that female athletics do not generate enough audience engagement.” The same is true with other sports as well. Managing Director of the Women on Boards advocacy group, Fiona Hathorn, says, “Had our culture been used to seeing women rather than men playing rugby or football for generations, we would find the idea of men playing sports rather novel.”

NO LONGER A RELEVANT QUESTION?

If you head over to Google, use their News Search and type in “WSL Surf World Championship”, “2018 Surfing World Championship”, “Surf World Title WSL”, or anything along those lines, an article on Stephanie Gilmore and her 7th world title will be the first article to pop up. Every time. This means, not only are women now starting to get the pay they rightly deserve, but they are starting to get the media attention that goes along with it.

It was just last week, that Stephanie Gilmore won her 7th world championship title, proving to the world that women’s surfing deserves just as much attention, respect, and prize money as men’s surfing. She is now tied with Layne Beachley for the women’s world record of most surfing world titles.

With all this being said about the inequality between women’s and men’s athletics, the second half of 2018 has been a major year for progression of equality in women’s surfing. Women are now getting paid the same as men, and with Gilmore’s 7th world title win, she is also getting the same media attention as the men.

Hats off to Sophie Goldschmidt, the World Surf League’s new (and first female) CEO for pushing for equality!

Cover Photo: World Surf League

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Himalaya

Mar 11, 2019

Tom Ballard and Daniele Nardi: Bodies Found on Nanga Parbat Confirmed to be Missing Climbers

The bodies of the British and Italian climbers were found more than a week after their last contact from the ninth highest mountain in the world.

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WRITTEN BY

Sean Verity

The last time that there had been any contact with Ballard and Nardi, it was on the 24th February, from an elevation of 6,300 metres. However, despite the mountaineering community’s hopes and prayers that the climbers would reappear, there was no news since. It stayed that way until “silhouettes” were spotted on the mountain on Wednesday. A complicated search had been called off, but following this sighting, it took another three days to confirm that those silhouettes are the bodies of Tom Ballard and Daniele Nardi.

A week ago, The Outdoor Journal asked Will History Repeat Itself in Search for Nardi and Ballard? After being missing for over a week, we drew a parallel with last year’s search and rescue mission on Nanga Parbat, when French mountaineer Elizabeth Revol and her Polish climbing mate, Tomek Mackiewicz, got into trouble on the “Killer Mountain”. Revol was rescued by a team that retreated off nearby K2, but Mackiewicz, unfortunately, did not make it.  

“You will be part of the history of mountaineering FOREVER”

Stefano Pontecorvo, the Italian ambassador to Pakistan, was the first to suggest that the bodies of the men had been found on the Mummery Spur trail.


Experienced Spanish climber Alex Txikon mostly abandoned his own winter attempt on K2, to lead the search and rescue effort. Following Stefano Pontecorvo’s comments, Alex subsequently posted his own message via his Facebook page. Mentioning that “The Nanga Parbat has taken two great and brilliant climbers. They have left before their time, but without a doubt, doing what they liked best.

Daniele Nardi’s team confirmed the news via Facebook, with a long statement in both Italian and English that announced that “We’re heartbroken; we inform you that the research of Daniele and Tom has ended…”

Tragically, Tom Ballard is the son of Alison Hargreaves, the first woman to summit Everest unaided, but who also sadly passed away in that same year whilst descending K2 in 1995.

Cover photo: Pervisha Khan, Ninth Highest Mountain of the World and Second Highest in Pakistan, Nanga Parbat. The shot was taken from Fairy Meadows

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